Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Carregando...

The Man Who Loved Children (1940)

de Christina Stead

Outros autores: Veja a seção outros autores.

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
1,2494111,464 (3.71)1 / 190
Sam and Henny Pollit have too many children, too little money, and too much loathing for each other. As Sam uses the children's adoration to ffed his own voracious ego, Henny watches in bleak despair, knowing the bitter reality that lies just below his mad visions. A chilling novel of family life, the relations between parents and children, husbands and wives.… (mais)
  1. 20
    Chesapeake Country de Lucian Niemeyer (TheWasp)
    TheWasp: illustrated overview of setting and history of area in which novel is based
  2. 10
    The Little Friend de Donna Tartt (shaunie)
  3. 00
    Nothing Holds Back the Night de Delphine de Vigan (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: unkonventionelle große Familien
  4. 01
    Farther Away: Essays de Jonathan Franzen (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: Jonathan Franzen preist den Roman von Christina Stead im Essay "Die tollste Familie, von der je erzählt wurde".
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

Mostrando 1-5 de 41 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
A masterpiece. A difficult, challenging, cruelly misanthropic, desperately hopeful (or hopefully desperate?), linguistic feat. Patrick White famously considered Christina Stead to be the greatest Australian novelist, and - although I think he was - Stead must be in the running. The dire situation of Henny and Sam's household was based in part on Stead's own childhood (the reason why she fled Australia) and you feel the needle-sharp accuracy of her characterisations. Surely neither of these people can be real. Yet they also feel so true. Yet they also feel so literary.

Stead must be read on her terms, especially in The Man Who Loved Children, but she will reward those who like their literature confronting, tangled, and inventive. (Also, if you're going to buy a used copy, buy the Penguin paperback from the 1960s with an introduction by Randall Jerrall! He almost single-handedly restored this forgotten 1940s novel to the public eye, and the introduction is a masterpiece of old-world criticism: even-handed, luxurious in its praise but fair in its criticisms, and masterful in its analysis of the central characters and themes.) ( )
  therebelprince | Nov 15, 2020 |
Why did I not know? How could it be? Stead, or at least this book, ranks with or above the other "all style, little to no story" masters/masterpieces of the century, right there with Joyce, Gass, and White. Her prose might actually be denser than theirs, her commitment to the sentence deeper.

MWLC is a flawed book in only one way: the first 100 pages are molasses slow, and to little obvious purpose. The whole thing is repetitive, but the first fifth. Oh boy. The repetition in the rest is earned; the first fifth is, I regret, dull. But much better that way than, as with Gass's 'Tunnel', White's 'Vivisector' or Joyce's everything, sticking the boring bits in the middle or end.

And Stead does much better than those esteemed gents at giving you some reason to keep reading, other than art for art's sake. Nobody will ever care whether Stephen and Bloom meet, but here I (at least) really wanted to know how this idiotic family would finally implode.

As with White (who blurbs this edition), Stead is perfect at dysfunctional relationships between individuals; unlike him, she can write about more than one person in any given scene. Like him, she traffics in dualities; but whereas his are abstract and philosophical, hers are rooted in history. Here, Henrietta (conservatism and aristocracy, but in the good way) faces off against Sam (progressive, but in the bad white-man-will-save-the-world way). It's a great portrait of early twentieth century American ideas.

And her rants are often better than Gass's. Consider, if nothing else, Henrietta on suicide:

"There are so many ways to kill yourself, they're just old-fashioned with their permanganate: do you think I'd take permanganate? I wouldn't want to burn my insides out and live to tell teh tale as well; itiots! It's simple. I'd drown myself. Why not put your head in a gas oven? They say it doesn't smell so bad..."

It continues for a page and a half, as she decides how she would, and wouldn't kill herself. It's glorious stuff. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
If Shakespeare had written this, we'd call it one of his 'difficult' plays. If Donna Tartt had written it we'd be dead from the shock. As exquisitely tailored as The Goldfinch is, this book is not. It's a meandering, repetitive quagmire.

Christina Stead, who was capable of great neatness in prose, took it upon herself in this book to write as people actually live and actually speak. The result makes one realise how important the writer is to the process of making ourselves bearable in print. Writers may need editors, but they are nonetheless the front line of editing themselves. Can a writer get away with telling it - really telling it - how it is: every mundane statement, tedious repetition, tawdry detail. I'd say, based on this book, a qualified 'yes'.

Rest here:

http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/the-man-who-loved-children... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
If Shakespeare had written this, we'd call it one of his 'difficult' plays. If Donna Tartt had written it we'd be dead from the shock. As exquisitely tailored as The Goldfinch is, this book is not. It's a meandering, repetitive quagmire.

Christina Stead, who was capable of great neatness in prose, took it upon herself in this book to write as people actually live and actually speak. The result makes one realise how important the writer is to the process of making ourselves bearable in print. Writers may need editors, but they are nonetheless the front line of editing themselves. Can a writer get away with telling it - really telling it - how it is: every mundane statement, tedious repetition, tawdry detail. I'd say, based on this book, a qualified 'yes'.

Rest here:

http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/the-man-who-loved-children... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
It's true, this may be the best and funniest book about family I've ever read. I think my favorite "recurring gag," of which this book has lots, is the way the dad is a real casual eugenicist. This book drags, often, but I think it's a very good study of human beings. The same way that "Heart is a Lonely Hunter" or "Endless Love" really stopped me in my tracks with the ability to GET people, so too did stuff like this:

"This messiness was only like all of Louie's contacts with physical objects. She dropped, smashed, or bent them; she spilled food, cut her fingers instead of vegetables and the tablecloth instead of meat. She was always shamefaced and clumsy in the face of that nature which Sam admired so much, an outcast of nature. She slopped liquids all over the place, stumbled and fell when carrying buckets, could never stand straight to fold the sheets and tablecloths from the wash without giggling or dropping them in the dirt, fell over invisible creases in rugs, was unable to do her hair neatly, and was always leopard-spotted yellow and blue with old and new bruises. She shut drawers on her fingers and doors on her hands, bumped her nose on the wall, and many time felt like banging her head against the wall in order to reach oblivion and get out of all this strange place in time where she was a square peg in a round hole.

Louie knew she was the ugly duckling. But when a swan she would never come sailing back into their village pond; she would be somewhere away, unheard of, on the lily-rimmed oceans of the world. This was her secret. But she had many other intimations of destiny, like the night rider that no one heard but herself. With her secrets, she was able to get out from nearly every one of the thousand domestic clashes of the year, and, as if going through a door into another world, forget about them entirely. They were doings of beings of a weaker sort."

And the same way that "Narrow Rooms" uses believability as the starting point for the MOST outrageous, fucked up family drama on planet Earth, so too does this book get away with a lot just because of how real it feels. Recommended if you can withstand a book that's like... 2/3 baby talk, btw.
( )
  uncleflannery | May 16, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 41 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This novel is not for everyone, nor for every mood. I have read it twice with great admiration. When I tried to read it a third time (when I had a young family myself), I couldn't stand it. If Hamlet runs four hours and Lear almost five, well, The Man Who Loved Children runs 14 or 15 hours, and though the plot is actually quite neat and progresses steadily, novel-readers are not used to 15-hour storms. The catharsis here, compared with any other tragedy, is a long time coming. Nevertheless, Stead's novel is like Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier in its power to astonish and compel with each reading. It is sui generis among novels, and Stead, too, never wrote anything else like it.
adicionado por PGCM | editarThe Guardian, Jane Smiley (Jun 10, 2006)
 
"Although “The Man Who Loved Children” is probably too difficult (difficult to stomach, difficult to allow into your heart) to gain a mass following, it’s certainly less difficult than other novels common to college syllabuses, and it’s the kind of book that, if it is for you, is really for you. I’m convinced that there are tens of thousands of people in this country who would bless the day the book was published, if only they could be exposed to it. I might never have found my way to it myself had my wife not discovered it in the public library in Somerville, Mass., in 1983, and pronounced it the truest book she’d ever read."
 
In a letter to Thistle Harris Stead in 1942 Christina Stead wrote:

Every work of art should give utterance, or indicate, the dreadful blind strength and the cruelty of the creative impulse, that is why they must all have what are called errors, both of taste and style: in this it is like a love-affair (a book, I mean.) A love affair is not delicate or clean: but it is an eye-opener! The sensuality, delicacy of literature does not exist for me; only the passion, energy and struggle, the night of which no one speaks, the creative act: some people like to see the creative act banished from the book - it should be put behind one and a neatly-groomed little boy in sailor-collar introduced. This is perhaps quite right. But for me it is not right: I like each book to have not only the little boy, not very neat, but also the preceding creative act: then it is only, that it gives me full satisfaction.1

Here is an author quite conscious of the imperfect, disunified nature of her art. In this letter, Stead shows a rather postmodern consciousness of the novel as creation and an interest in exposing the act of creation in the work of art. Without the assistance of poststructuralist critics, Stead points to the importance of 'errors' as indicators to the reader of art's place in life - art as 'struggle', as process rather than as product.
 
Zeer lovende bespreking. Ook nawoord en vertaling worden hogelijk geprezen.

"Pas bij de heruitgave in 1966 kreeg het boek, mede door een lang nawoord van Randall Jarrell, de aandacht die het verdiende, en al snel werd het beschouwd als veruit de meest indrukwekkende roman uit de hele Australische literatuur van de twintigste eeuw."
adicionado por PGCM | editarVrij Nederland
 
Het is erg knap zoals Stead Sams maatschappelijke idealen koppelt aan de praktijk van het gezin – tirannie, manipulatie, geldingsdrang en emotionele chantage (‘Sammiepammie vraagt niet veel, alleen dit...’).
De man die van kinderen hield is te vol om hier recht te doen, soms misschien zelfs iets te vol. Maar de indruk die na lezing overblijft, is een aangrijpend beeld van destructie. De ideale staat die Sam thuis probeert te creëren, ontaardt in een hel. Een koningsdrama, maar wel een dat zich afspeelt binnen een ‘gewoon’ gezin. Het drama wordt door die gewoonheid alleen maar versterkt, en dat zal de reden zijn geweest dat het in de jaren zestig lezers wél aansprak, en dat het boek invloed zou krijgen op andere schrijvers. Ik kan me voorstellen dat bijvoorbeeld A.M. Homes dit las, voordat ze Music for Torching (1999) over een disfunctioneel gezin in een Amerikaanse buitenwijk schreef.
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Christina Steadautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Barbero, SilviaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Benítez Reyes, FelipeIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bergsma, PeterTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bossi, FlorianaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carter, AngelaPrefácioautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Franzen, JonathanIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hébert, C. M.Narradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jarrell, RandallIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lessing, DorisIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schmidt, MichaelIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Premiações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
All the June Saturday afternoon Sam Pollit's children were on the lookout for him as they skated round the dirt sidewalks and seamed old asphalt of R Street and Reservoir Road that bounded the deep-grassed acres of Tohoga House, their home.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
En je kan alles aan, alle wereldproblemen, terwijl er de hele tijd andere vrouwen zijn, jij hypocriet, jij smerige, bloedeloze hypocriet, te goed, andere vrouwen, wetenschapsvrouwen, jonge meiden en je eigen vrouw. Ik zal al je wetenschappelijke verenigingen schrijven, ik zal de Dienst voor Natuurbehoud schrijven, ik zal ze eens vertellen wat voor leven ik heb gehad. Sla me maar, sla me maar neer, ik kan er niet meer tegen. Je dreigt maar je doet niks, niks om me een kans te geven om weg te komen, niet voordat je iets tegen me hebt om mijn kinderen te stelen. Maar dat zal je niet, dat zal je niet! Ik vermoord ze allemaal, ik vermoord ze allemaal vanavond, ik giet die stinkende olie brandend je strot in en en vermoord mijn kinderen, je krijgt ze niet.
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em Holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Sam and Henny Pollit have too many children, too little money, and too much loathing for each other. As Sam uses the children's adoration to ffed his own voracious ego, Henny watches in bleak despair, knowing the bitter reality that lies just below his mad visions. A chilling novel of family life, the relations between parents and children, husbands and wives.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Links rápidos

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.71)
0.5 3
1 8
1.5 2
2 10
2.5 8
3 26
3.5 15
4 48
4.5 11
5 48

GenreThing

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 159,164,390 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível