Página inicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquise No Site
Este site usa cookies para fornecer nossos serviços, melhorar o desempenho, para análises e (se não estiver conectado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing, você reconhece que leu e entendeu nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade . Seu uso do site e dos serviços está sujeito a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados do Google Livros

Clique em uma foto para ir ao Google Livros

Snow (Revolutionary Writing) de Orhan Pamuk
Carregando...

Snow (Revolutionary Writing) (original: 2002; edição: 2010)

de Orhan Pamuk (Autor)

MembrosResenhasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaConversas / Menções
7,0561481,319 (3.57)1 / 465
Fiction. Literature. Suspense. Thriller. HTML:Dread, yearning, identity, intrigue, the lethal chemistry between secular doubt and Islamic fanaticism??these are the elements that Orhan Pamuk anneals in this masterful, disquieting novel. An exiled poet named Ka returns to Turkey and travels to the forlorn city of Kars. His ostensible purpose is to report on a wave of suicides among religious girls forbidden to wear their head-scarves. But Ka is also drawn by his memories of the radiant Ipek, now recently divorced. Amid blanketing snowfall and universal suspicion, Ka finds himself pursued by figures ranging from Ipek's ex-husband to a charismatic terrorist. A lost gift returns with ecstatic suddenness. A theatrical evening climaxes in a massacre. And finding god may be the prelude to losing everything else. Touching, slyly comic, and humming with cerebral suspense, Snow is of immense relevance to our present mome… (mais)
Membro:ednasilrak
Título:Snow (Revolutionary Writing)
Autores:Orhan Pamuk (Autor)
Informação:Faber and Faber (2010), Edition: Revolutionary Writing, 448 pages
Coleções:Sua biblioteca
Avaliação:***
Etiquetas:1001btrbyd

Informações da Obra

Snow de Orhan Pamuk (2002)

Adicionado recentemente porghneumann, biblioteca privada, Ed_Schneider, BecYF, jenkies720, chewie93, riverartsandbooks, greigroselli, srdjansmirovic
  1. 30
    The White Tiger de Aravind Adiga (SqueakyChu)
    SqueakyChu: Both books provide satire about a man's country
  2. 21
    The Castle de Franz Kafka (Medellia)
  3. 00
    Blood Tie de Mary Lee Settle (FranklyMyDarling)
    FranklyMyDarling: Another excellent novel set in Turkey; this one centers on the expat community in an Aegean coastal town.
  4. 00
    Papa Sartre: A Modern Arabic Novel (Modern Arabic Literature) de Ali Bader (Cecilturtle)
  5. 01
    The People's Act of Love de James Meek (IamAleem)
Carregando...

Registre-se no LibraryThing tpara descobrir se gostará deste livro.

» Veja também 465 menções

Inglês (119)  Holandês (6)  Alemão (5)  Francês (4)  Espanhol (2)  Italiano (2)  Turco (2)  Dinamarquês (1)  Hebraico (1)  Polonês (1)  Norueguês (1)  Sueco (1)  Todos os idiomas (145)
Mostrando 1-5 de 145 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Orhan Pamuk's Snow falls into a weird, middle-ground territory for me. It's a well-crafted tale, rich with context and layers of meaning. But I didn't actually enjoy reading it all that much. From a third-person narrator point of view (we'll get to that later), Snow tells the story of Ka, a Turkish poet who has spent much of his adult life in political exile in Germany, newly returned to his home country for his mother's funeral. When he hears from an acquaintance that a beautiful former college classmate, Ipek, is freshly divorced, living in a border town called Kars, he finds himself a pretext to visit there to see her. The pretext is that there's been a recent wave of suicides among devout Muslim young women, who have been forbidden by government policy to wear their headscarves, and he's there to investigate.

The snow is already falling thickly when Ka arrives in Kars, and it ends up closing off the community over one long, turbulent weekend in which there are assassinations, coups, and police brutality. There are several storylines, all interwoven tightly: the community debate over headscarves, Ka's courtship of Ipek, Ka's suddenly rediscovered inspiration to write poetry, Ipek's relationship with her sister Kadife, both of their ties to a wanted terrorist, the poverty and desperation of the men in Kars, the hope and idealism of the boys at the Muslim high school. The theme of the tension between the West/secularism and the East/religion is pervasive, coloring all of the events of the novel.

Which turns out to be a story within a story, as we find out that the tale of Ka's time in Kars is being told by his friend "Orhan", based on Ka's own written recollections. It's a little bothersome that although the conceit is that the story is being told by a third party, the narrator seems omniscient more often than not, but it's not a dealbreaker. What is more bothersome is that there is none of the characters is particularly well-developed, or to me, identifiable. Ipek is the embodiment of the virgin/whore dichitomy, either idealized or compared to a porn star. The terrorist, Blue, is constantly described as compelling without much in the story to make the reader understand why. Even Ka, though he is the center of the narrative, remains at a frustrating remove. Like Turkey itself, he's neither completely Eastern nor completely Western and vacillates between the two. He doesn't know his own mind, and it makes him hard to get a hold of as a character.

But the writing and structure is lovely. It's a little snowglobe of a story, and effectively creates the air of emotional claustrophobia that anyone who's been stranded (by snow or flooding or ice) for a few days can understand. I'm not sure that the third-party narrator is as effective a device as it could be, but I got a wry, frustrated smile out of plot machinations that mean that we never actually get to read one of Ka's inspired poems...it lets us just imagine how great the poems must have been without putting Pamuk under pressure to write something magnificent. This was a book club selection, and proved divisive for the most part: there were several people who loved it and just as many who completely hated it, with only very few (like me) falling in between. I wouldn't necessarily recommend it based on my own experience of it, but maybe you'll completely love it like some of my book club friends? ( )
  ghneumann | Jun 14, 2024 |
��
  AnkaraLibrary | Feb 23, 2024 |
La novela Nieve de Orhan Pamuk se desarrolla en la ciudad de Kars, ubicada en el noreste de Turquía, en la región de Anatolia. Esta ciudad ha sido históricamente un punto de encuentro entre diferentes culturas y religiones, lo que ha generado tensiones y conflictos a lo largo de los años. En el siglo XX, Kars fue testigo de la lucha entre el gobierno turco y los separatistas armenios, lo que llevó a la masacre de miles de armenios en la ciudad en 1915.
Además, en la década de 1990, Kars fue escenario de una serie de enfrentamientos entre el gobierno turco y los separatistas kurdos, lo que generó una gran inestabilidad política y social en la región. Todo este contexto histórico y cultural se refleja en la novela de Pamuk, que retrata la vida en Kars en un momento de gran agitación política y social.
La novela también aborda temas como la religión, la identidad nacional y la modernidad, que son centrales en la sociedad turca contemporánea. Pamuk explora cómo estas cuestiones se entrelazan y se influyen mutuamente, y cómo afectan la vida de las personas en Kars y en Turquía en general. En definitiva, Nieve es una obra que ofrece una mirada profunda y compleja sobre la sociedad turca y su historia, y que invita al lector a reflexionar sobre cuestiones fundamentales de la condición humana.
Uno de los personajes principales de «Nieve» es Ka, un poeta turco que ha vivido en el exilio en Alemania durante muchos años. Ka regresa a su ciudad natal, Kars, para investigar una serie de suicidios de jóvenes mujeres que han sido atribuidos a la opresión religiosa en la región. Ka es un personaje complejo y contradictorio, que lucha con su propia identidad y su relación con la religión y la política en Turquía. A lo largo de la novela, Ka se encuentra con varios personajes que representan diferentes facetas de la sociedad turca, desde el fundamentalismo religioso hasta la secularización y la modernidad. A través de su interacción con estos personajes, Ka se ve obligado a confrontar sus propias creencias y prejuicios, lo que lo lleva a una profunda reflexión sobre la naturaleza de la identidad y la cultura en Turquía.
La estructura narrativa de Nieve, la novela del escritor turco Orhan Pamuk, es compleja y está cuidadosamente diseñada para mantener al lector en constante tensión. La historia se divide en tres partes, cada una de las cuales se centra en un personaje diferente y su perspectiva de los eventos que se desarrollan en la ciudad de Kars, en el este de Turquía.
La primera parte está narrada por Ka, un poeta que regresa a Kars después de muchos años en el exilio. Ka es un personaje complejo y contradictorio, y su narración está llena de reflexiones sobre la poesía, la religión y la política. La segunda parte está narrada por Ipek, una antigua amiga de Ka que se convierte en su amante durante su estancia en Kars. La perspectiva de Ipek es más emocional y personal, y su narración se centra en su relación con Ka y su conflicto interno entre sus sentimientos por él y su compromiso con su esposo.
La tercera parte está narrada por un narrador omnisciente que proporciona una visión más amplia de los eventos que se desarrollan en Kars. Esta parte es especialmente importante porque es aquí donde se revelan las verdaderas motivaciones de los personajes y se resuelven los conflictos que se han ido desarrollando a lo largo de la novela.
La estructura narrativa de Nieve es un ejemplo de cómo la literatura puede ser utilizada para explorar temas complejos y presentar múltiples perspectivas sobre un mismo evento. Pamuk utiliza la estructura para crear una tensión constante y mantener al lector enganchado hasta el final.
El simbolismo es una técnica literaria que se utiliza para representar ideas abstractas a través de objetos, acciones o personajes concretos. En la novela «Nieve» de Orhan Pamuk, el simbolismo está presente en cada página y es una herramienta fundamental para entender la complejidad de la trama y los personajes.
Uno de los símbolos más evidentes en la novela es la nieve misma. La nieve es un elemento recurrente que aparece en diferentes momentos de la historia y que tiene múltiples significados. Por un lado, la nieve representa la belleza y la pureza, pero también puede ser vista como algo frío y peligroso. En la novela, la nieve se convierte en un símbolo de la soledad y el aislamiento, ya que los personajes se ven atrapados en una ciudad cubierta de nieve y no pueden salir de ella.
Otro símbolo importante en «Nieve» es el velo. El velo es un objeto que se utiliza para ocultar algo o protegerlo de la vista de los demás. En la novela, el velo representa la falta de transparencia y la dificultad para conocer la verdad. Los personajes se esconden detrás de velos y máscaras, lo que hace que sea difícil saber quiénes son en realidad y cuáles son sus verdaderas intenciones.
En conclusión, el simbolismo es una técnica literaria que Orhan Pamuk utiliza de manera magistral en «Nieve». A través de símbolos como la nieve y el velo, el autor logra transmitir ideas complejas y profundas sobre la naturaleza humana y la sociedad en la que vivimos.
La nieve es un elemento recurrente en la novela Nieve de Orhan Pamuk, y su presencia no es solo física, sino que también se convierte en una metáfora poderosa que se utiliza para explorar temas como la soledad, la alienación y la pérdida. En la novela, la nieve se convierte en un símbolo de la desconexión entre los personajes y su entorno, y se utiliza para representar la sensación de aislamiento y la falta de comunicación que experimentan los personajes. Además, la nieve también se utiliza para explorar la idea de la memoria y la nostalgia, ya que su presencia evoca recuerdos del pasado y la sensación de que el tiempo se ha detenido. En resumen, la nieve en Nieve de Orhan Pamuk es mucho más que un simple elemento climático, sino que se convierte en una metáfora poderosa que se utiliza para explorar temas profundos y complejos.
La relación entre Ka y Ipek es uno de los temas más importantes en la novela Nieve de Orhan Pamuk. Desde el principio, se puede sentir la tensión entre los dos personajes, quienes se conocieron en la escuela y luego se reencuentran en la ciudad de Kars. A medida que la historia avanza, se revelan los sentimientos profundos que ambos tienen el uno por el otro, pero también las barreras que les impiden estar juntos.
Ka es un poeta que ha regresado a Kars después de muchos años en el extranjero. Él está enamorado de Ipek, pero ella está comprometida con otro hombre. A pesar de esto, Ka no puede evitar sentirse atraído por ella y se esfuerza por ganar su corazón. Ipek, por su parte, también tiene sentimientos por Ka, pero está atrapada en una relación infeliz y no sabe cómo escapar.
La relación entre Ka e Ipek es complicada y está llena de altibajos. A veces parecen estar cerca de estar juntos, pero luego algo sucede para separarlos. Sin embargo, a pesar de las dificultades, su amor sigue siendo fuerte y persistente. En última instancia, la relación entre Ka e Ipek es un reflejo de la complejidad de las relaciones humanas y de cómo el amor puede ser tanto una fuente de felicidad como de dolor.
La crítica social es un tema recurrente en la obra de Orhan Pamuk, y «Nieve» no es la excepción. A través de la historia de Ka, un poeta que regresa a su ciudad natal en Turquía, Pamuk nos muestra las complejidades de la sociedad turca contemporánea. Uno de los temas más destacados en la novela es la tensión entre la religión y la secularización. Pamuk retrata una sociedad dividida entre aquellos que abrazan la religión y aquellos que buscan una vida más moderna y secular. Esta tensión se ve reflejada en la figura de Ka, quien se debate entre su amor por la poesía y su deseo de encontrar un lugar en una sociedad que parece estar en constante conflicto consigo misma. Además, Pamuk también critica la corrupción política y la falta de libertad de expresión en Turquía, temas que son especialmente relevantes en la actualidad. En definitiva, «Nieve» es una obra que nos invita a reflexionar sobre los desafíos que enfrenta la sociedad turca y, por extensión, la sociedad global en la que vivimos.
La religión es un tema recurrente en la novela Nieve de Orhan Pamuk. En esta obra, el autor explora la importancia de la religión en la vida de los personajes y cómo esta influye en sus decisiones y acciones. La novela está ambientada en la ciudad de Kars, una ciudad turca donde conviven musulmanes y laicos. A lo largo de la historia, se puede apreciar cómo la religión es un factor determinante en la vida de los personajes, especialmente en aquellos que son más devotos.
Uno de los personajes más interesantes en cuanto a su relación con la religión es Ka, el protagonista de la novela. Ka es un poeta que ha vivido en Alemania durante muchos años y que regresa a Kars para investigar una serie de suicidios entre las jóvenes de la ciudad. A lo largo de la novela, se puede ver cómo Ka se debate entre su fe y su escepticismo. Por un lado, Ka es un musulmán que cree en Dios y en los preceptos del Islam. Por otro lado, Ka es un hombre racional que cuestiona la existencia de Dios y que se siente atraído por la ciencia y la razón.
La religión también es un tema importante en la novela porque es un factor que divide a la sociedad de Kars. Los musulmanes y los laicos tienen visiones muy diferentes sobre la religión y sobre cómo debe ser la sociedad. Los musulmanes son más conservadores y defienden la tradición y la religión, mientras que los laicos son más progresistas y defienden la modernidad y la secularización. Esta división se hace evidente en la novela cuando se produce un golpe de estado en la ciudad y los militares toman el poder. Los musulmanes ven esto como una oportunidad para imponer su visión de la sociedad, mientras que los laicos ven esto como una amenaza a sus libertades y derechos.
En conclusión, la religión es un tema fundamental en la novela Nieve de Orhan Pamuk. A través de los personajes y de la trama, el autor explora la importancia de la religión en la vida de las personas y cómo esta influye en la sociedad. La novela es un ejemplo de cómo la religión puede ser un factor de unión o de división en una sociedad y cómo puede influir en las decisiones y acciones de las personas.
En su novela «Nieve», Orhan Pamuk presenta una crítica mordaz a la sociedad turca contemporánea. A través de la historia de Ka, un poeta que regresa a su ciudad natal en busca de inspiración, Pamuk expone las tensiones y contradicciones que existen en la sociedad turca, especialmente en lo que respecta a la religión, la política y la identidad nacional.
Uno de los temas principales de la novela es la relación entre el Islam y la modernidad. Pamuk muestra cómo la religión sigue siendo una fuerza poderosa en la vida de los turcos, pero también cómo la modernidad y la globalización están cambiando la forma en que la gente vive y piensa. Ka, el protagonista, es un ejemplo de esta tensión: es un poeta que se siente atraído por la belleza y la espiritualidad del Islam, pero también es un hombre moderno que se siente incómodo con las restricciones y la intolerancia de la religión.
Otro tema importante en «Nieve» es la política y la corrupción en Turquía. Pamuk muestra cómo la política y la religión están estrechamente entrelazadas en la sociedad turca, y cómo la corrupción y la violencia son una parte integral de la vida política. La novela también aborda la cuestión de la identidad nacional y la relación de Turquía con Europa y el mundo occidental.
En resumen, «Nieve» es una novela compleja y rica en temas y simbolismo. A través de la historia de Ka y su regreso a su ciudad natal, Pamuk ofrece una crítica profunda y conmovedora de la sociedad turca contemporánea, y plantea preguntas importantes sobre la religión, la política y la identidad nacional. ( )
  aliexpo | Feb 15, 2024 |
"Heaven was the place where you kept alive the dreams of your memories."

Ka is a Turkish poet and political exile living in Germany. He returns to his homeland to attend his mother's funeral and whilst in the country decides to travel to the eastern town of Kars. He arrives in a snowstorm on the last bus before the roads behind him are closed cutting off the town. Ka is purportedly in the town as a journalist, to write about the forthcoming mayoral elections and a recent spate of suicides by young girls banned from school for wearing headscarves but in reality he is motivated more by the hope of a romance with an old school friend, Ipek.

As Ka explores the teahouses, back streets, and institutions of Kars he meets a whole host of people, a newspaper editor who writes the news before it happens, a sheikh, an Islamist teenager who wants to become a science-fiction writer, a terrorist and the headscarf-wearing sister of the woman he hopes to entice back to Germany, and of course the ever-present members of secret police.

While Kars is shut off from the outside world, a coup is carried out by elements of the military led by the leader of a theatrical troupe. Ka himself is uninterested in politics, but he is forced to participate to protect himself and to achieve his dream of a future life with Ipek. Nor can he control his poetic inspiration, which keeps seizing him without warning.

The story is told in the third person, the narrator is a novelist called Orhan, a friend of Ka's who is reconstructing the poet's life after his death several years later even going as far as visiting Kars himself and talking to the people that Ka met there.

Kars is a town a long way from its heyday when it was on important trade routes, but it still exhibits the political and social conflicts of Turkey as a whole: between state and society, between the secular and the religious, between provincial and metropolitan, between Western and Eastern and Pamuk explores all these issues. But it is also a portrait of obsession and jealousy that probes the relationship between art and life.

"Snow" is an ambitious novel and a character driven one. It is something of a slow burner rather than a rip-roaring read but I still found it highly absorbing and I felt that Pamuk held all his many strands together really well. However, I also felt a little let down by the ending. I'm not convinced that there was a need for the narrator to travel to Kars at all as I didn't think that it really added anything to the overall plot, a few questions were answered many were not. Personally I felt that the book should have ended when Ka boarded the train. Nevertheless I would still recommend the book to anyone curious about Turkey. ( )
  PilgrimJess | Aug 2, 2023 |
Didn’t finish, boring. ( )
  ramrak | Jul 14, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 145 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
This seventh novel from the Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk is not only an engrossing feat of tale-spinning, but essential reading for our times.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (88 possíveis)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Pamuk, Orhanautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Anna PolatTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Atwood, MargaretIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bertolini, MartaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Carpintero Ortega, RafaelTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Citak, ManuelArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Dorleijn, MargreetTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Freely, MaureenTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gall, JohnDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gezgin, ŞemsaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Heijden, Hanneke van derTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Johansson, IngerTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kojo, TuulaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Você deve entrar para editar os dados de Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Compartilhado.
Título canônico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lugares importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Eventos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Our interest's on the dangerous edge of things.
The honest thief, the tender murderer,
The superstitious atheist.
- Robert Browning, 'Bishop Blougram's Apology'
Politics in a literary work are a pistol-shot in the middle of a concert, a crude affair though one impossible to ignore. We are about to speak of very ugly matters.
- Stendhal, The Charterhouse of Parma
Well, then, eliminate the people, curtain them, force them to be silent. Because the European Enlightenment is more important than people.
- Feyodor Dostoevsky, Notebooks for The Brothers Karamazov
The Westerner in me was discomposed.
- Joseph Conrad, Under Western Eyes
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Rüya
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The silence of the snow, thought the man sitting just behind the bus driver. If this were the beginning of a poem, he would have called the thing he felt inside him the silence of snow.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
...Heaven was the place where you kept alive the dreams of your memories. (p. 296)
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Clique para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Aviso de desambiguação
Editores da Publicação
Autores Resenhistas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Idioma original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
CDD/MDS canônico
LCC Canônico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Fiction. Literature. Suspense. Thriller. HTML:Dread, yearning, identity, intrigue, the lethal chemistry between secular doubt and Islamic fanaticism??these are the elements that Orhan Pamuk anneals in this masterful, disquieting novel. An exiled poet named Ka returns to Turkey and travels to the forlorn city of Kars. His ostensible purpose is to report on a wave of suicides among religious girls forbidden to wear their head-scarves. But Ka is also drawn by his memories of the radiant Ipek, now recently divorced. Amid blanketing snowfall and universal suspicion, Ka finds himself pursued by figures ranging from Ipek's ex-husband to a charismatic terrorist. A lost gift returns with ecstatic suddenness. A theatrical evening climaxes in a massacre. And finding god may be the prelude to losing everything else. Touching, slyly comic, and humming with cerebral suspense, Snow is of immense relevance to our present mome

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo em haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Links rápidos

Avaliação

Média: (3.57)
0.5 6
1 48
1.5 11
2 113
2.5 36
3 304
3.5 107
4 471
4.5 74
5 203

É você?

Torne-se um autor do LibraryThing.

 

Sobre | Contato | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blog | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Históricas | Os primeiros revisores | Conhecimento Comum | 206,979,707 livros! | Barra superior: Sempre visível