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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration

de Isabel Wilkerson

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3,8311532,458 (4.45)475
In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porwabookworm, richarnd, biblioteca privada, redtape, apeagan, tank1010, RichfieldUMC, bowershouse, LavarJames
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Mostrando 1-5 de 152 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
Excellent documentation. ( )
  lynngood2 | Oct 7, 2021 |
There is only one other history book I have read where I was crying at the end and that was McCullough's biography of John Adams.The tears were of similar origin, awe at staggering achievements. Adams, yes, on the macro scale and Wilkerson's on both, although coming through best on the micro scale in the individual stories she gives us, and, in my mind both stories deeply intertwined. What the stories of the Black men and women who migrated out of the oppressive south prove is that the United States, just by managing to come into being, by putting the open-ended language into that extraordinary document "The Declaration of Independence" and by developing a Constitution, body of essential law, that despite our current atmosphere, ARE living documents: the former containing, almost miraculously, guidance for continuing to develop and change the latter. Wilkerson's achievement is bringing the decades-long story of the massive migration of Black people from the rural South to the urban North into focus at both the macro and the micro level through alternating individual stories and historical background. Her sense of what the reader can manage (the horrors, that is) and her timing for when to shift and move forward, always returning to press the painful points again, is pitch perfect. There have been a zillion rave reviews and I now add mine, but I encourage the reader to make that connection in hearts and minds between our founding documents and the incredible act of faith and bravery the Black migration story offers. ***** ( )
2 vote sibylline | Sep 14, 2021 |
In telling the story of the Great Migration, Isabella Wilkerson focuses on three people who left the South during three different decades. Additionally, Wilkerson cites evidence to support her claim, which is that the Great Migration changed the nation. Wilkerson chronicles the life of Ida Mae Gladney, George Stearling, and Robert Foster. Their stories reveal the desperation, dignity, and determination of the nearly 6 million people who left the South between 1915 and 1970 for life in the North and West. ( )
  unit731a | Sep 3, 2021 |
I had heard of Wilkerson’s masterful social history, but had just never gotten around to reading it. Thanks to my F2F book club, however, the time is now.

One thing I really appreciate about this work is how Wilkerson focuses on three individuals: Ida Mae Gladney who moved north to Chicago in 1937; George Starling who went from Florida to Harlem in 1945; and Robert Foster who settled in Los Angeles in 1953 to pursue the kind of medical practice unavailable to him in Louisiana.

Using these three personal stories made the book much more interesting and accessible, even though she did include much of the academic, sociological reports that these stories illustrated. I was interested and engaged from beginning to end. And I look forward to our book club discussion. The whole concept of the Great Migration was not new to me, but I still learned some things and have much more to consider.

Robin Miles does a fine job of narrating the audiobook. She had a large book with much detail to relate and she kept it interesting and informative. This kind of nonfiction is a little easier to listen to than a strictly academic report, and I thank the author for that style of writing.

I do wish that the text had included some photos, but the 1st edition hardcover I took out of the library did not. ( )
  BookConcierge | Aug 22, 2021 |
Kristi Wachter rec
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 152 (seguinte | mostrar todas)
I give this book two enthusiastic thumbs up: you’ll not only learn a lot about this underappreciated part of recent America history (I see its remnants about me every day in Chicago, since I live on the South Side, perhaps the most famous destination of the Migration), but also become deeply involved in the lives of Ida Mae, George, and Robert. The ending is poignant and bittersweet, and will make you both proud of the migrants and sad about their fate. The writing is quite good (Wilkerson won a Pulitzer Prize for journalism—the first black woman to do so—for her work at The New York Times), and the scholarship, though thorough, is worn lightly. (The book was 15 years in the making and Wilkerson interviewed over 1200 people.) If there’s one flaw—and it’s a small one—the writing is occasionally awkward and more than occasionally repetitious, with the same facts repeated in different places. But that’s a trifle that should by no means put you off.
 
Wilkerson intersperses historical detail of the broader movement and the sparks that set off the civil rights era; challenging racial restrictions in the North and South; and the changing dynamics of race, class, geography, politics, and economics. A sweeping and stunning look at a watershed event in U.S. history.
adicionado por sduff222 | editarBooklist, Vanessa Bush (Sep 15, 2010)
 
Wilkerson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, uses the journeys of three of them-a Mississippi sharecropper, a Louisiana doctor, and a Florida laborer--to etch an indelible and compulsively readable portrait of race, class, and politics in 20th-century America. History is rarely distilled so finely.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarEntertainment Weekly, Tina Jordan (Sep 10, 2010)
 
Not since Alex Haley's Roots has there been a history of equal literary quality where the writing surmounts the rhythmic soul of fiction, where the writer's voice sings a song of redemptive glory as true as Faulkner's southern cantatas.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarSan Francisco Examiner
 
The Warmth of Other Suns is a brilliant and stirring epic, the first book to cover the full half century of the Great Migration....Wilkerson combines impressive research...with great narrative and literary power. Ms. Wilkerson does for the Great Migration what John Steinbeck did for the Okies in his fiction masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath; she humanizes history, giving it emotional and psychological depth.
adicionado por ArrowStead | editarThe Wall Street Journal
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Wilkerson, Isabelautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Burns, KenIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Miles, RobinNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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I was leaving the South
To fling myself into the unknown. . . .
I was taking a part of the South
To transplant in alien soil,
To see if it could grow differently.
If it could drink of new and cool rains,
Bend in strange winds,
Respond to the warmth of other suns
And, perhaps, to bloom.

- Richard Wright
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To my mother and
to the memory of my father,
whose migration made me possible,
and to the millions of others like them
who dared to act upon their dreams.
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The night clouds were closing in on the salt licks east of the oxbow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the Yalobusha River.
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In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.

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