Let's Get Our Priorities Straight

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Let's Get Our Priorities Straight

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1UtopianPessimist
Jan 26, 2010, 3:49 am

I've just (well, it's been a year) moved to Canada from the US and have noticed many little differences in our language. One that has me completely puzzled is the use of "priorize" for prioritize. It seems like lots of folks use it - often very well-educated and well-spoken in other ways (unless this actually IS a well-spoken way). Any feedback?

2erilarlo
Jan 26, 2010, 3:28 pm

There's no excuse for it.

3nperrin
Jan 26, 2010, 5:38 pm

Weird. I'm a USian who lived for several years in Canada and I don't remember ever hearing that. I was in Quebec, but interacting with plenty of Canadians from elsewhere.

4_Zoe_
Jan 26, 2010, 5:54 pm

Even I don't remember hearing people say that, and I've lived in Canada almost my whole life.

5UtopianPessimist
Jan 27, 2010, 8:39 pm

We ended up talking about this during coffee today at my job (Cambridge Ontario) - Everyone there said they had heard it but thought it was only by those who were not well-read or educated. Then I mentioned the people I heard use it, and they were surprised. After that we got into the topic of oriented / orientated and preventive / preventative. The first in each pair were the only "correct" way when I was a child and the second in each pair have become accepted.

Sometimes I feel REALLY old, though most of the time I feel only 28 (which I was 30 years ago).

6pinkozcat
Jan 28, 2010, 1:01 am

Administered / administrated?

I hear administrated all the time but think that there is a difference in meaning these days. One administers medication but administrates a company.

I think that the media has a great deal to answer for in this case.

7JemmyHope
Fev 2, 2010, 11:02 am

I suspect that neither of these words has a pedigree, that both are modern business jargon, possibly post-World War II. If this is so, then neither word deserves a seal of authenticity.

8erilarlo
Fev 5, 2010, 11:23 am

They're back-formations that leave in too much of a different form rather than using the original, shorter form, and they all irritate me. 8-)

9vpfluke
Fev 17, 2010, 6:45 pm

There is a Latin verb, administrare, presumably the past participle is administratus.

10CliffordDorset
Editado: Fev 21, 2010, 7:30 am

And a piece of particularly woolly administration would have been 'administrato-cumulus', perhaps?

11modalursine
Abr 22, 2010, 8:17 pm

Come to think of it, I've been hearing "Fity" for "Fifty".

Is that a (western) regionalism or what?

12DaynaRT
Abr 22, 2010, 9:59 pm

>11 modalursine:
It's an urban/hip-hop thing.

13modalursine
Abr 22, 2010, 10:33 pm

ref #12
Egads! Its spreading.

14pinkozcat
Maio 8, 2010, 8:23 pm

I have just lifted this directly from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's webpage:

"The Government also wants to establish breastfeeding as a separate ground for discrimination and ensure protections apply equally to men and women."

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/05/09/2894197.htm

Bad reporting or has our Federal Government finally gone completely mad?