JayneCM Finds Magic in 2024

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JayneCM Finds Magic in 2024

1JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 3:57 am



I am Jayne, a book lover for as long as I can remember.

This is my sixth year in the challenge. I am always too ambitious but you can never read too much!

“You can find magic wherever you look. Sit back and relax, all you need is a book.” – Dr. Seuss

My 'handle' on discord and Youtube is "IReadCerealBoxes" so a few years back I made my own TBR/reading challenge board game based on 1980s cereal boxes. I will be playing this in 2024 to make four of my book choices each month.

And just as my own extra challenge (and to encourage more use of my Kindle Unlimited subscription), I will fill as many challenges as possible with books from KU. I will mark books I read from KU so I can keep track and see if it is worth while, both in terms of numbers read and types of books available.

29/211 = 13.74%

Read Around The World 1/12 = 8.33%
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 7/48 = 14.58%
Reading Through Time = 3/16 = 18.75%
BingoDOG 4/25 = 16%
CalendarCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
HistoryCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
PrizeCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
RandomKIT 2/12 = 16.67%
AlphaKIT 4/26 = 15.38%
MysteryKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
ScaredyKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
SFFKIT 0/12 = 0%

2JayneCM
Editado: Fev 28, 1:32 am



'Read Around The World' - read a book from every country

“When I read a good book, it’s like traveling the world without ever leaving my chair.” Richard Peck


Create Your Own Visited Countries Map


1. The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See (China) - finished 18th January 2024
2. The Life of Insects by Viktor Pelevin (Russia) -
3. Night Train To Marrakech by Dinah Jefferies (Morocco) -
4. Motherland: A Memoir by Paula Ramon (Venezuela) -
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.

1/12 = 8.33%

3JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 3:59 am





I Read Cereal Boxes board game

"Pay attention, don't let life go by you. Fall in love with the back of your cereal box." Jerry Seinfeld

January
1. Fantasy square - Pemberley: Mr. Darcy's Dragon by Maria Grace - finished 22nd January 2024
2. Card - big book - War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - finished 31st January 2024
3. Card - most recent purchase - Lives of the Ancient Egyptians by Toby Wilkinson - finished 19th January 2024
4. Card - short stories - Edgar Allan Cozy by various authors - finished 2nd January 2024

February
5. Classic square - The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayette
6. Card - World War II - The English GI by Jonathon Sandler - finished 4th February 2024
7. Non fiction square - The Greek Way by Edith Hamilton - finished 20th February 2024
8. Card - book in translation - Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov

March
9. Brown cover - Outpost by Dan Richards
10. Blue cover - Dead Voices by Katherine Arden - finished 1st March 2024
11. Sci fi - The Man Who Fell To Earth by Walter Tevis
12. Card - flowers on cover - After The Forest by Kell Woods

April
13.
14.
15.
16.

May
17.
18.
19.
20.

June
21.
22.
23.
24.

July
25.
26.
27.
28.

August
29.
30.
31.
32.

September
33.
34.
35.
36.

October
37.
38.
39.
40.

November
41.
42.
43.
44.

December
45.
46.
47.
48.

7/48 = 14.58%

4JayneCM
Editado: Fev 27, 8:16 am



Reading Through Time

"By reading we discover our world, our history and ourselves." Daniel J. Boorstin

Monthly challenges
January - Janus - House of Odysseus by Claire North - finished 13th January 2024
February - Aquarius and amethyst - Without Precedent by Owen Zupp - finished 27th February 2024
March - Medicine, epidemics and plagues - The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

Quarterly challenges
January-March - Prehistoric - Scenes From Prehistoric Life by Francis Pryor - finished 28th January 2024
April-June -
July-September -
October-December -

3/16 = 18.75%

5JayneCM
Editado: Fev 28, 1:25 am



BingoDOG

"It's not just luck; it's Bingo magic!"



1. A book featuring twins -
2. Epistolary or diary format The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
3. A book featuring water - Dark Waters by Katherine Arden
4. A book written in another cultural tradition - How To Say Babylon by Safiya Sinclair
5. Read a current/recent bestseller -
6. A book about a topic about which you have specific knowledge or expertise -
* 7. Title contains a person's name - The Minuscule Mansion of Myra Malone by Audrey Burges - finished 23rd January 2024
8. A book with an ugly cover -
9. A book with fewer than 100 copies on LT - Lace and Lies by Nancy Warren
10. The words "Big" or "Little" in the title -
11. Features a paper based item in the plot - The Echo of Old Books by Barbara Davis
12. Something themed around food or cooking - The Poisoned Chocolates Case by Anthony Berkeley
13. Read a CAT - The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall (January CalendarCAT - published 1st January 1928) -
14. Written by an author 65 or older - The Road by Cormac McCarthy
15. A short story collection/anthology -
16. Something written by a person of colour -
* 17. A three-word title - The Ice Maze by Isobelle Carmody - finished 2nd February 2024
* 18. A book from one of the libraries listed under the "Similar libraries" featured on your LT profile page - The Fraud by Zadie Smith - finished 3rd February 2024
19. Set in the city -
20. Involves warriors or mercenaries -
21. Reread a favourite book -
22. A book about friendship - Remarkably Bright Creatures by Shelby Van Pelt
* 23. Something that takes place in multiple countries - Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter - finished 10th February 2024
24. A book with nothing on the cover but the title and author - 10:04 by Ben Lerner
25. First published in a year ending in 24 - Bride or The House of Last Resort

4/25 = 16%

6JayneCM
Editado: Fev 24, 4:52 pm



CalendarCAT

"Don't be fooled by the calendar. There are only as many days in the year as you make use of." Charles Richards

January - Welcome to the Hyunam-Dong Bookshop by Hwang Bo-reum (published 17th January 2022) - finished 18th February 2024
February - Longbourn: Dragon Entail by Maria Grace (Year of the Dragon) - finished 24th February 2024
March - The Bitter Glass by Eilís Dillon (author born March 7, 1920) -
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

1/12 = 8.33%

7JayneCM
Editado: Fev 16, 11:48 pm



HistoryCAT

"History cannot give us a program for the future, but it can give us a fuller understanding of ourselves, and of our common humanity, so that we can better face the future." Robert Penn Warren

January - Wars and Conflicts of the Americas - A Girl Called Samson by Amy Harmon (American Revolution) - finished 3rd January 2024
February - Georgian/Regency/Victorian Britain - When He Was Wicked by Julia Quinn - finished 16th February 2024
March - Science and medicine - The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

2/12 = 16.67%

8JayneCM
Editado: Fev 14, 7:34 pm



PrizeCAT

"Generally, literary prizes are significant not for who the winner is but the discussion they create around books." Richard Flanagan

January - Long running prizes - Portrait of Clare by Francis Brett Young (winner 1927 James Tait Black Memorial Prize) - finished 26th January 2024
February - Prize from your own country - Chai Times at Cinnamon Gardens by Shankari Chandran (winner 2023 Miles Franklin Award) - finished 5th February 2024
March - Prize that's new to you - Strange Weather in Tokyo by Hiromi Kawakami (winner 2001 Tanizaki Award) -
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

2/12 = 16.67%

9JayneCM
Editado: Fev 24, 4:51 pm



RandomKIT

"In a world like this one, only the random makes sense." Libba Bray

January - Early birds - The Secrets of the Huon Wren by Claire van Ryn - finished 5th January 2023
February - Escape or rescue - A Wolf Called Wander by Roseanne Parry - finished 14th February 2024
March - World Wildlife Day - Birds and Us by Tim Birkhead
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

2/12 = 16.67%

10JayneCM
Editado: Fev 18, 6:27 pm



AlphaKIT

"“There is another alphabet, whispering from every leaf, singing from every river, shimmering from every sky.” Dejan Stojanovic

January
For A - Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery - finished 8th January 2023
For Y - House of Yesterday by Deeba Zargarpur - finished 12th February 2024

February
For F - The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing
For E - Extraordinary Birds by Sandy Stark-McGinnis - finished 6th February 2024

March
For H - Bleak House by Charles Dickens
For R - The Ride of Her Life by Elizabeth Letts

April
For U -
For O -

May
For N -
For P -

June
For J -
For B -

July
For I -
For S -

August
For M -
For G -

September
For V -
For C -

October
For D -
For T -

November
For L -
For W -

December
For K -
For Q -

Year Long
For X -
For Z - Zorrie by Laird Hunt

3/26 = 11.54%

11JayneCM
Editado: Fev 18, 4:42 am



MysteryKIT

"“The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery.” Anais Nin

January - Short stories - Serpents in Eden: Countryside Crimes edited by Martin Edwards - finished 6th January 2023
February - True unsolved mysteries - The Survival of the Princes in the Tower by Matthew Lewis
March - Historical mysteries - The Body Under The Piano by Marthe Jocelyn
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

1/12 = 8.33%

12JayneCM
Editado: Fev 19, 5:31 pm



ScaredyKIT

"“Don't be afraid of being scared. To be afraid is a sign of common sense. Only complete idiots are not afraid of anything.” Carlos Ruiz Zafón

January - Psychological thriller - The Housemaid by Frieda McFadden - finished 10th January 2024
February - Gothic - The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole
March - True crime - The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer by Liza Rodman
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -


1/12 = 8.33%

13JayneCM
Editado: Fev 22, 6:17 pm



SFFKIT

"I define science fiction as the art of the possible. Fantasy is the art of the impossible." Ray Bradbury

January - Epic fantasy - Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb
February - Critters and creatures - Netherfield: Rogue Dragon by Maria Grace -
March - Space opera - Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente -
April -
May -
June -
July -
August -
September -
October -
November -
December -

0/12 = 0%

14JayneCM
Editado: Jan 1, 4:25 am

All set up for 2024! How did it get here so quickly?!

As always, I have added all the CATs and KITs, in the hope that I will be able to keep up - we shall see.

15MissWatson
Nov 15, 2023, 9:02 am

Congrats on your setup and happy reading in 2024!

16christina_reads
Nov 15, 2023, 10:55 am

I love your quotes and the ScaredyKIT pic! Looking forward to following along with your 2024 reading.

17majkia
Nov 15, 2023, 10:59 am

Great setup. Hope the reading is wonderful.

18LadyoftheLodge
Nov 15, 2023, 12:14 pm

I love the quotes and graphics! You are a star for me!

19beccac220
Nov 15, 2023, 2:52 pm

Love the format! Is it okay if I fashion mine after yours? It looks very similar to how I did mine on Goodreads.

20VivienneR
Nov 15, 2023, 3:11 pm

Just dropping in to wish you happy reading in 2024. Your format is perfect!

21pamelad
Nov 15, 2023, 3:23 pm

Great quotes, Jayne. All the best for this ambitious challenge!

22JayneCM
Nov 15, 2023, 4:14 pm

Thank you all!

>19 beccac220: Absolutely! I do love to keep track of the numbers, so mine is pretty structured. Whether I get to tick all the boxes or not is another question!

23dudes22
Nov 16, 2023, 5:36 am

I love the quotes you've picked for your categories. Hope you have a great reading year.

24Tess_W
Nov 16, 2023, 11:18 am

Love the quotes! Happy reading in 2024!

25MissBrangwen
Nov 16, 2023, 2:07 pm

Like last year, I admire your elaborate setup and enjoyed reading all those wonderful quotes! I'm looking forward to following along!

26DeltaQueen50
Nov 16, 2023, 2:41 pm

I've placed my star and I am looking forward to following along!

27JayneCM
Nov 16, 2023, 3:57 pm

>24 Tess_W: >25 MissBrangwen: >26 DeltaQueen50: Thank you! It is fun setting up the challenge every year.

28mstrust
Nov 16, 2023, 5:00 pm

Happy new thread, and good luck in 2024! I'm looking forward to seeing what you read in the Mystery and Scaredy KITS.

29MissWatson
Nov 19, 2023, 4:57 am

>4 JayneCM: Those are quite challenging prompts! Good luck with those.

30NinieB
Nov 19, 2023, 8:21 am

As Birgit says, very challenging! I'm looking forward to another year of following along!

31lowelibrary
Nov 19, 2023, 9:18 pm

Good luck with your reading this year. I love your use of percentages to keep track of your goals. Looking forward to getting more Bullets from your thread.

32JayneCM
Nov 19, 2023, 10:59 pm

>29 MissWatson: >30 NinieB: >31 lowelibrary: Thank you! I do enjoy the 52 Book Club prompts as they are a little more challenging. But 2024 does seem even more so than other years!

33clue
Nov 27, 2023, 8:44 pm

I think I need to be ready for the BBs to flow! Your plan looks amazing and I hope you enjoy the year.

34rabbitprincess
Nov 27, 2023, 9:12 pm

Love the illustration for >13 JayneCM: Gorgeous skies!

Have fun with your various challenges!

35JayneCM
Editado: Dez 9, 2023, 12:16 am

Slight revamp! I've added in my own board game for 2024 and Reading Through Time, where I have been a lurker and occasional poster for a few years. Taken out Pop Sugar and The 52 Book Club challenge - while I love them, they do contribute nearly 100 books to my 2024 total! Trying to wind it back just a smidge. :)

36VivienneR
Dez 9, 2023, 1:40 am

>35 JayneCM: Very clever! That will keep things interesting.

37DeltaQueen50
Dez 9, 2023, 12:40 pm

Great to see you planning on spending some time at the Reading Through Time site. I decided to also drop a couple of the longer challenges that I was originally planning on as I didn't want to burn out on challenges or feel obligated to read something that I wasn't in the mood for.

38JayneCM
Editado: Dez 15, 2023, 12:10 am

>36 VivienneR: Hopefully!

>37 DeltaQueen50: Yes, as we are getting to the tail end of the year and I find myself looking for the shortest books possible just to tick off boxes, I can see I need to be less ambitious! Quality not quantity.

39Jackie_K
Dez 17, 2023, 6:50 am

My star is placed - you always read such interesting books!

40JayneCM
Dez 19, 2023, 4:59 am

>39 Jackie_K: Thank you! Hopefully you will find something of interest.

41JayneCM
Editado: Fev 8, 10:43 pm



January 2024

1. Edgar Allan Cozy by various authors - finished 2nd January 2024 - I Read Cereal Boxes board game - short stories
2. A Girl Called Samson by Amy Harmon - finished 3rd January 2024 - conflicts in the Americas
3. The Secrets of the Huon Wren by Claire van Ryn - finished 5th January 2024 - January RandomKIT - early birds
4. Serpents In Eden edited by Martin Edwards - finished 6th January 2024 - January MysteryKIT - short stories
5. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery - finished 8th January 2024 - January AlphaKIT - letter A
6. The Housemaid by Freida McFadden - finished 10th January 2024 - January ScaredyKIT - psychological thriller
7. House of Odysseus by Claire North - finished 13th January 2024 - January Reading Through Time - Janus
8. The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See - finished 18th January 2024 - Read Around The World (China)
9. Lives of the Ancient Egyptians by Toby Wilkinson - finished 19th January 2024 - January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - most recent purchase
10. Pemberley: Mr Darcy's Dragon by Maria Grace - finished 22nd January 2024 - January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - fantasy
11. The Minuscule Mansion of Myra Malone by Audrey Burges - finished 23rd January 2024 - BingoDOG - title contains a person's name
12. Portrait of Clare by Francis Brett Young - finished 26th January 2024 - January PrizeCAT - long running prize
13. Scenes From Prehistoric Life by Francis Pryor - finished 28th January 2024 - Reading Through Time Jan-Mar quarter - prehistoric
14. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - finished 31st January 2024 - January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - big book

14/211 = 6.64%

Read Around The World 1/12 = 8.33% The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 4/48 = 8.33% Edgar Allan Cozy, Lives of the Ancient Egyptians, Pemberley: Mr Darcy's Dragon, War and Peace
Reading Through Time = 2/16 = 12.5% House of Odysseus, Scenes From Prehistoric Life
BingoDOG 1/25 = 4% The Minuscule Mansion of Myra Malone
CalendarCAT 0/12 = 0%
HistoryCAT 1/12 = 8.33% A Girl Called Samson
PrizeCAT 1/12 = 8.33% Portrait of Clare
RandomKIT 1/12 = 8.33% The Secrets of the Huon Wren
AlphaKIT 1/26 = 3.85% Anne of Green Gables
MysteryKIT 1/12 = 8.33% Serpents In Eden
ScaredyKIT 1/12 = 8.33% The Housemaid
SFFKIT 0/12 = 0%

42JayneCM
Editado: Fev 2, 8:20 am

My plan for January CATs, KITs and other reads

✅ Read Around The World - The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See (China) *
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 1. Fantasy - Pemberley: Mr. Darcy's Dragon by Maria Grace **
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 2. Big book - War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy *
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 3. Most recent purchase - Lives of the Ancient Egyptians by Toby Wilkinson
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 4. short stories - Edgar Allan Cozy by various authors *
✅ Reading Through Time - Janus - House of Odysseus by Claire North
✅ Reading Through Time - first quarter - prehistoric - Scenes From Prehistoric Life by Francis Pryor *
✅ BingoDOG - 1. - person's name in title - The Minuscule Mansion of Myra Malone by Audrey Burges
BingoDOG - 2. - book from LT similar library - The Fraud by Zadie Smith
CalendarCAT - January - Death In Rome by Wolfgang Koeppen ***
✅ HistoryCAT - Conflicts in the Americas - A Girl Called Samson by Amy Harmon *
✅ PrizeCAT - Long-running prize - Portrait of Clare by Francis Brett Young
✅ RandomKIT - Early birds - The Secrets of the Huon Wren by Claire van Ryn
✅ AlphaKIT - A - Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery *
AlphaKIT - Y - House of Yesterday by Deeba Zargarpur
✅ MysteryKIT - Short stories - Serpents in Eden: Countryside Crimes edited by Martin Edwards *
✅ ScaredyKIT - Psychological thriller - The Housemaid by Freida McFadden *
SFFKIT - Epic fantasy - Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb *

* available on Kindle Unlimited (in Australia)
** This book, the first in the series, was 99c (in December 2023) on Kindle. The remainder of the series (11 books) is on Kindle Unlimited.
*** available to borrow for free on archive.org

I could definitely fill all these with Kindle Unlimited books, but I also have some library and owned books that I would like to read.

43lowelibrary
Dez 26, 2023, 3:33 pm

>42 JayneCM: I am looking forward to your reviews of The Echo of Old Books and Pemberley: Mr. Darcy's Dragons. I already see some BBs in my future.

44JayneCM
Editado: Dez 31, 2023, 7:53 am



45hailelib
Dez 31, 2023, 12:12 pm

That's a nice variety of titles for January!

Have a great New Year.

46JayneCM
Editado: Jan 20, 5:54 am



Book 1. Edgar Allan Cozy by various authors

January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - short stories


The short stories included in this collection were enjoyable reads. They were just missing the sharp and creepy edge of the originals. My favourite was the first entry in the collection, which was a poem called The Raven.

47JayneCM
Editado: Jan 22, 3:36 pm



Book 2. A Girl Called Samson by Amy Harmon

January HistoryCAT - conflicts in the Americas


"That's what I wanted most in the world, to be responsible for and to no one but myself."

A gripping read, based on the true story of Deborah Sampson who disguised herself as a man in order to join the Patriot forces in the American Revolutionary War.
As a girl/woman, Deborah has never been able to make her own life choices and the war offers her the opportunity to choose her own path, to use her bravery, cleverness and sense of justice for something that matters.
Still undecided on whether the romance element was necessary, particularly as it was not true to the real Deborah. But a compelling story, even more so as it was based on a true story. What an amazing woman.

48thornton37814
Jan 5, 8:20 am

I really didn't look at the BINGO card this year, but I like the categories better than most years. Hope you have a great year of reading!

49JayneCM
Jan 5, 3:31 pm



Book 3. The Secrets of the Huon Wren by Claire van Ryn

January RandomKIT - early birds


A captivating and moving read and beautifully evocative of place; the descriptions of Tasmania are stunning. Although it depicts the devastation wrought by dementia and thus pain and loss, the overall feeling you are left with is uplifting.
A magnificent debut novel.

50clue
Jan 5, 8:33 pm

>49 JayneCM: And what a beautiful cover.

51JayneCM
Jan 5, 9:47 pm

>50 clue: Oh, it is. It is actually a fairywren, my favourite bird. The huon wren refers to the fact that the main character has a fairy wren carved out of huon pine.

52JayneCM
Editado: Jan 14, 4:48 am



Book 4. Serpents In Eden edited by Martin Edwards

January MysteryKIT - short stories


This is my first read from the British Library Crime Classics series and as there are a huge number of them, both story collections and novels, on Kindle Unlimited, it will not be my last.
Thoroughly enjoyed all the stories, but two favourites stood out.
The Inquest by Leonora Wodehouse was sharp and witty and so tongue in cheek. Wonderful dry humour.
The Scarecrow was written by Ethel Lina White, who also wrote the books that the movies The Lady Vanishes and The Spiral Staircase were based on. You can definitely see in this story why her writing translates so well to the screen and this story would be no exception. Scarecrows are always creepy!

53MissBrangwen
Editado: Jan 6, 6:28 am

>49 JayneCM: What a beautiful cover indeed! Fairy wrens are such pretty birds. I have a small box picturing one that I bought on Kangaroo Island and that I still cherish.

>52 JayneCM: I have several British Library Crime Classics, but no short story collection so far. They all look so tempting and I just love the covers! It's good to hear that you enjoyed all the stories.

54susanj67
Jan 6, 7:27 am

Hello Jayne! I love your categories and organisation above. I read a couple of the British Library Crime Classics collections of Christmas short stories last month and there were some excellent ones in those. It was always very snowy, though, which it rarely is in England at Christmas :-) I saw lots on KU so you'll have plenty to keep you going.

55thornton37814
Jan 6, 9:55 am

>52 JayneCM: I love the cover, but the first title word turns me off!

56JayneCM
Jan 8, 4:45 am

>55 thornton37814: There are definitely no actual serpents in the stories! :)

57JayneCM
Jan 8, 4:45 am

>54 susanj67: I am very keen to read more as this collection was very enjoyable.

58hailelib
Jan 8, 11:36 am

I prefer the novels but the one collection I read had some pretty good stories in it.

59Tess_W
Jan 8, 11:57 am

>49 JayneCM: Definitely goes on my WL

60JayneCM
Editado: Jan 8, 8:33 pm

>52 JayneCM: Fairy wrens are my favourite bird - I love to watch them flitting around the backyard. I would love to go to Kangaroo Island one day. It seems ridiculous that I have not, as it is only in the next state!

>53 MissBrangwen: I love that era of mystery writing. I think I could just read those for the whole year, there are so many on KU!

>54 susanj67: No serpents in any of the stories luckily!

>57 JayneCM: I need to decide on some of the novels to read - there are just so many to choose from!

>58 hailelib: I hope you enjoy it.

61thornton37814
Jan 8, 8:23 pm

>56 JayneCM: An unfortunate title then!

62JayneCM
Jan 8, 8:32 pm



Book 5. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery

January AlphaKIT - letter A


"There's such a lot of different Annes in me. I sometimes think that is why I'm such a troublesome person. If I was just the one Anne it would be ever so much more comfortable, but then it wouldn't be half so interesting."

I agree, Anne, I agree!

Call me sentimental and wallowing in nostalgia, but I will always love rereading the Anne books and it felt like time for another go around of the series.
Nothing much needs to be said except that Anne and her adventures (and misadventures) will forever be delightful. And the nature descriptions of the island are beautiful.

63JayneCM
Editado: Jan 10, 10:48 pm



Book 6. The Housemaid by Freida McFadden

January ScaredyKIT - psychological thriller


Really liked the format of the book; seeing the current day and then going back to see how this had all come to pass. The epilogue was great, enough so that I want to read the next book.
Most of the book though was a bit formulaic for me, which to some extent is part of the setup of the story and was cleverly woven into the framework. But overall a good read.

64cbl_tn
Jan 11, 8:45 am

>62 JayneCM: A kindred spirit!

>52 JayneCM: I love reading mystery anthologies. I've discovered several new-to-me authors to explore after reading one of their short stories in an anthology like this. It's how I discovered Christiana Brand.

>47 JayneCM: A couple of years ago my book club read They Fought Like Demons about women soldiers in the Civil War. I'd love to read something similar about women who fought in the Revolutionary War if there is such a book.

65JayneCM
Editado: Jan 11, 5:14 pm

>64 cbl_tn: Interesting - I have only Christiana Brand's Nurse Matilda books. I did not know she wrote mysteries as well.

I couldn't find many books specifically about women soldiers in the Revolutionary War, just books that had stories of a few women playing different roles, such as Revolutionary Mothers and Women Heroes of the American Revolution. There are a few books just about Deborah Sampson, which would be interesting to read as the author of the historical fiction I read did say she invented certain aspects of the story, such as the romance angle.

66JayneCM
Editado: Jan 19, 7:28 am



Book 7. House of Odysseus by Claire North

January Reading Through Time - Janus


'The only one who can tell you what to feel is you.'
'No one else must be permitted to put words in your mouth.'


But for the women of Ancient Greece, this is easier said than done. This is a reimagining of some of Penelope's time on Ithaca when Odysseus was away.
The men spend their time posturing and swaggering while that 'tricksy Ithacan queen' and the women around her use their cleverness and cunning to twist the men's doings (without them even knowing) to their advantage.
A fascinating look at court intrigue and politics in Ancient Greece. I just was not taken with it being from the viewpoint of Aphrodite. I would have much preferred it to be Penelope's voice.

67JayneCM
Editado: Jan 23, 10:09 pm



Book 8. The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

Read Around The World - China


A fascinating look into the lives of the Akha, one of China's ethnic minorities who have lived in isolated villages high up in the mountains for generations, and their tea growing heritage. What happens when the modern world intersects with their ancient culture?
Also a heart breaking look at international adoptions and how all concerned are affected.

68JayneCM
Editado: Fev 13, 12:12 am



Book 9. Lives of the Ancient Egyptians by Toby Wilkinson

January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - most recent purchase


Fascinating and enjoyable little snippets of 100 lives from Ancient Egyptians. Not just the pharaohs and high officials; there are also lives of scribes, farmers, workmen and others, covering 3000 years of the Ancient Egyptian culture. I appreciated the author's slightly tongue in cheek outlook on some of the events in these lives.

70JayneCM
Jan 21, 3:53 am

>69 Tess_W: This was my first book by this author, despite having them all on my to read list for ages. I am looking forward to more as this one seemed very well researched.

71JayneCM
Editado: Jan 26, 10:53 pm



Book 10. Pemberley: Mr Darcy's Dragon by Maria Grace

January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - fantasy


Just loved this! The different varieties of dragons, ranging from the tiny and adorable to the huge and terrifying, are wonderful, each with their own distinct personality.
I loved how the author weaved in events from Pride and Prejudice and stayed true to the book, while making it fit with the 'new' dragon storyline. Elizabeth is just as feisty, yet now she is a Dragon Keeper. I particularly loved Mary's elevation to more than just the receptacle of either pity or derision.
This book ended at the Netherfield ball so am very keen to see what happens next.
A very cosy and charming read.

72christina_reads
Jan 22, 5:22 pm

>71 JayneCM: I am drawn to this somewhat against my will...might have to check it out! Oddly enough, I do own (but haven't yet read) another book that melds P&P with dragons, Heartstone by Elle Katharine White.

73lowelibrary
Jan 22, 6:27 pm

I was waiting on your review of this book to see if you got me with a bullet. You did taking a BB for >71 JayneCM:

74JayneCM
Jan 23, 10:09 pm

>71 JayneCM: And I will have to check that one out!

>72 christina_reads: I hope you enjoy it. It is a very cosy, light read, perfect for an afternoon of fun reading.

75JayneCM
Editado: Jan 29, 7:20 am



Book 11. The Minuscule Mansion of Myra Malone by Audrey Burges

BingoDOG - title contains a person's name


I was definitely drawn to this book as I love anything miniature. I used to collect miniature reproduction Victorian furniture and furnishings so I was very interested to read about Myra's mansion. A mansion, NOT a dollhouse!
It is certainly a slow build up and the multiple timelines may frustrate some readers. I am a fan of multiple timelines - the more, the merrier. I love the slow reveal as the timelines begin to meld and meet up with each other and you learn more and more about each character.
And the magical elements of the house, making it a character in its own right, were charming and sometimes a little sinister.
Definitely an enchanting read; slow, soothing and delightful.

76VivienneR
Jan 24, 1:38 am

>68 JayneCM: I've taken a BB on that one. It sounds fascinating. I have a hold on another Toby Wilkinson book but this one sounds more appealing.

77casvelyn
Jan 24, 8:08 am

>75 JayneCM: This would be a BB if it wasn't on my list already! I'm glad the book is good though, I added it to my TBR for the alliteration. :)

78JayneCM
Jan 24, 10:02 pm

>76 VivienneR: It is a good book for dipping in and out of, as each life is only a few pages long. I have just picked up the author's book A World Beneath The Sands as well.

>77 casvelyn: Perfect for an alliteration prompt! Hope you enjoy it.

79MissBrangwen
Jan 26, 2:33 pm

>71 JayneCM: I listened to a nonfiction book by Maria Grace about Regency Christmas traditions in 2022, but I wasn't aware that she also writes fiction, and such fiction as that!

>78 JayneCM: Oh, I have that book as well, or rather my husband has because I gifted it to him last year. He hasn't read it yet, though. I hope to read it one day, too, and I'm looking forward to your thoughts when you get to it!

80JayneCM
Editado: Fev 1, 12:50 am



Book 12. Portrait of Clare by Francis Brett Young

January PrizeCAT - long running prize


Winner of the 1927 James Tait Black Memorial Prize

An eloquent, meandering tale following Clare's life. In a note from the author, he mentions that he had difficulty in publishing this book, eventually changing publishers, as his original publisher declared the book to be too lengthy and not 'modern'. Certainly if you require a fast paced read with plenty of action, this is not for you. Yet, I adored it, for its beautiful writing, particularly of the landscape and nature of Herefordshire; for its clear sighted look at relationships and their success or failure; and a peek into times past.
It is often more engaging and illuminating to read contemporary books of the past than historical fiction, as the authors actually lived in those times. Francis Brett Young did not write about World War I from research - he used his own memories of his time serving.
Overall, a lovely book - about, in the author's words, "a normal and (possibly) a rather silly woman moving quite unimportantly across the West Midland landscape."

81pamelad
Jan 27, 3:27 am

>80 JayneCM: Glad to see your lucky find was a good read.

82JayneCM
Editado: Fev 2, 7:52 am



Book 13. Scenes From Prehistoric Life by Francis Pryor

Reading Through Time Jan-Mar quarter - prehistoric


"There is a tendency to view the prehistoric past as somehow inferior to the modern world - to believe that we have 'progressed' beyond such superstitious beliefs. I disagree profoundly with this rather patronizing view of our ancestors."

The author has written this more as a chatty stroll through the various ancient sites of Britain, focusing on the landscape and the people who lived there rather than bogging the reader down with minutely detailed facts. It is clear that he has a deep respect for the inhabitants of the past and their achievements. Fascinating to read of sites lesser known to me - Stonehenge yes, but Seahenge? I'd never heard of it before.

83Tess_W
Jan 30, 12:10 pm

>82 JayneCM: Sounds informative but enjoyable. Off to find.......

84JayneCM
Editado: Fev 5, 6:41 am



Book 14. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

January I Read Cereal Boxes board game - big book


When I drew the 'big book' card in my board game, I figured why not go all in and read a REALLY big one!

This epic novel is a triumph of life, love, sorrow, suffering, joy, grief, happiness, the entire spectrum of human emotion. Yet it is also a historical masterpiece, with Tolstoy often digressing to discuss his philosophy of history and other topics. This is particularly so of the Second Epilogue, which as an ending to the book, is a real let down. You know when you have spent so long with characters and you just want to close the book at the end, give it a hug and think about Pierre, Natasha, Mary and Nicholas for a while? By the time you work your way through the Second Epilogue, you have forgotten all about them!
A minor issue though for this absorbing and magnificent novel.

Tolstoy's insight into human nature, both individual and collective, is remarkable. And shows that we as humans don't change through time - although we think now we are all so intelligent and modern and technologically advanced, we are still the same.

The futility and chaos of war is movingly depicted, with heart rending depictions of death and injury, torture and hardship throughout the war scenes.

Tolstoy's humour and tongue in cheek attitude shows through in lines such as:

""Everything had been admirably thought out as is usual in dispositions, and as is always the case, not a single column reached its place at the appointed time."

"Though the doctors treated him, let his blood, and gave him medications to drink, he nevertheless recovered.

Truly a fabulous book.

85JayneCM
Fev 1, 2:19 am

Not too bad for the first month of 2024.

5973 pages read.

14 books read in the following formats:

6 Kindle Unlimited
3 library
4 owned (reducing that owned TBR!)
1 Kindle owned

I do need to carry over three books, but that is my fault for choosing a 1200+ page book and an 800+ page book in the same month. But let's be honest, I will probably do it again throughout the year!

86JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 3:59 am

My plan for February CATs, KITs and other reads

Read Around The World - The Life of Insects by Viktor Pelevin (Russia) -
I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 1. Classic square - The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayette
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 2. World War II - The English GI by Jonathon Sandler
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 3. Non fiction - The Greek Way by Edith Hamilton
I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 4. Book in translation - Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov
✅ Reading Through Time - Aquarius and amethyst - Without Precedent by Owen Zupp
✅ BingoDOG - 1. - Something that takes place in multiple countries - Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter
✅ BingoDOG - 2. - three-word title - The Ice Maze by Isobelle Carmody
✅ CalendarCAT - Year of the Dragon - Longbourn: Dragon Entail
✅ HistoryCAT - Georgian/Regency/Victorian Britain - When He Was Wicked by Julia Quinn
✅ PrizeCAT - Prize from your own country - Chai Time at Cinnamon Gardens by Shankari Chandran (winner 2023 Miles Franklin Award)
✅ RandomKIT - Escape or rescue - A Wolf Called Wander by Roseanne Parry
✅ AlphaKIT - F - The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing
✅ AlphaKIT - E - Extraordinary Birds by Sandy Stark-McGinnis
MysteryKIT - True unsolved mysteries - The Survival of the Princes in the Tower by Matthew Lewis
ScaredyKIT - Gothic - The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole
SFFKIT - Critters and creatures - Netherfield: Rogue Dragon by Maria Grace

Carry forward from January

✅ BingoDOG - book from LT similar library - The Fraud by Zadie Smith
✅ CalendarCAT - January - Welcome to the Hyunam-Dong Bookshop by Hwang Bo-reum
✅ AlphaKIT - Y - House of Yesterday by Deeba Zargarpur
SFFKIT - Epic fantasy - Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb

87dudes22
Fev 1, 7:30 am

>85 JayneCM: - 14 books with a couple of chunksters is a great month. I almost always carry over 3 books - 1 physical, 1 audio, and 1 e-book that I don't quite manage to finish.

88christina_reads
Fev 1, 10:44 am

>84 JayneCM: I also really liked War and Peace, but I agree with you about the second epilogue! Tolstoy certainly was cranky about How To Do History (and How Everyone Else Was Doing It Wrong).

89Jackie_K
Fev 1, 1:06 pm

>84 JayneCM: I'm sure I'm a terrible person, but I just skimmed the bits where he was pontificating about battle strategy, and barely bothered with the Second Epilogue at all! I found his "I know best and I'm going to tell you in excruciating detail whether you want to hear it or not" manner really annoying!

90hailelib
Fev 1, 1:37 pm

>82 JayneCM: Looks good and my library actually has. I may read it eventually.

91pamelad
Fev 1, 3:57 pm

>86 JayneCM: I've put Chai Times at Cinnamon Gardens on hold for the February PrizeCAT.

92Tess_W
Fev 1, 4:27 pm

>85 JayneCM: Great stats! I also liked W&P.

93JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 4:01 am



February 2024

15. The Ice Maze by Isobelle Carmody - finished 2nd February 2024 - BingoDOG - three word title
16. The Fraud by Zadie Smith - finished 3rd February 2024 - BingoDOG - book from similar LT library
17. The English GI by Jonathon Sandler - finished 4th February 2024 - February I Read Cereal Boxes board game - World War II
18. Chai Time at Cinnamon Gardens by Shankari Chandran - finished 5th February 2024 - February PrizeCAT - prize from your own country (2023 winner Miles Franklin Award)
19. Extraordinary Birds by Sandy Stark-McGinnis - finished 6th February 2024 - February AlphaKIT - letter E
20. Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter - finished 10th February 2024 - BingoDOG - set in multiple countries
21. House of Yesterday by Deeba Zargarpur - finished 12th February 2024 - January AlphaKIT - letter Y
22. A Wolf Called Wander by Roseanne Parry - finished 14th February 2024 - February RandomKIT - escape or rescue
23. When He Was Wicked by Julia Quinn - finished 16th February 2024 - February HistoryCAT - Georgian/Regency/Victorian Britain
24. Welcome To The Hyunam-dong Bookshop by Hwang Bo-reum - finished 18th February 2024 - January CalendarCAT - published 17th January
25. The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing - finished 19th February 2024 - February AlphaKIT - letter F
26. The Greek Way by Edith Hamilton - finished 20th February 2024 - February I Read Cereal Boxes board game - non fiction
27. Longbourn: Dragon Entail by Maria Grace - finished 24th February 2024 - February CalendarCAT - Year of the Dragon
28. Without Precedent by Owen Zupp - finished 27th February 2024 - February Reading Through Time - Aquarius and amethyst

28/211 = 13.27%

Read Around The World 1/12 = 8.33%
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 6/48 = 12.5% The English GI, The Greek Way
Reading Through Time = 3/16 = 18.75% Without Precedent
BingoDOG 4/25 = 16% The Ice Maze, The Fraud, Nights At The Circus
CalendarCAT 2/12 = 16.67% Welcome To The Hyunam-dong Bookshop,Longbourn: Dragon Entail
HistoryCAT 2/12 = 16.67% When He Was Wicked
PrizeCAT 2/12 = 16.67% Chai Time at Cinnamon Gardens
RandomKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
AlphaKIT 4/26 = 15.38% Extraordinary Birds, House of Yesterday, The Fifth Child
MysteryKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
ScaredyKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
SFFKIT 0/12 = 0%

94JayneCM
Editado: Fev 4, 7:09 am



Book 15. The Ice Maze by Isobelle Carmody

BingoDOG - three word title


While slower paced than the previous two books in this series, your attention is still held by the wonderful descriptions and the relationships between Zluty, Bily, the diggers and the monster. The diggers in particular are just delightful. Their speech reminds me of Mr Miyagi or Yoda - "Never stupidness to think before acting."
The reasons for the journey being undertaken are intriguing - the whole world is intriguing. There are so many weird and wonderful concepts and I am fascinated to read the final book to see how all the pieces slot together.

95JayneCM
Editado: Fev 11, 5:30 am



Book 16. The Fraud by Zadie Smith

BingoDOG - book from similar LT library


I am so sad to be disappointed as this should have been an automatic win for me. It was just too disjointed, with too many topics mixed in. The short chapters that jumped between people/location/time meant that you were unable to immerse yourself before you were yanked to somewhere or someone else. The section on Mr. Bogle's past was the strongest in the book and I definitely became invested in his story.
There is more than one potential book in here. The schism between Ainsworth and Dickens would have been fascinating in itself as would the Tichborne case and the sugar or cotton industries.

96JayneCM
Editado: Fev 5, 10:49 pm



Book 17. The English GI by Jonathon Sandler

February I Read Cereal Boxes board game - World War II


In 1939, sixteen year old Bernard Sandler went on a schoolboy trip from Leeds UK to the US and Canada. The beginning of World War II meant that he was not to return until 1946.
Bernard Sandler had written a memoir of his time serving in the US army which forms the basis of this graphic novel by his grandson.
The artwork depicts the 1940s perfectly and the use of newspaper articles, photos and other family memorabilia enhance the reading experience.
This would be perfect for younger students to learn more about serving in the army, particularly from a Jewish perspective, in a more immersive and engaging fashion than reading a written account. There are also extensive notes providing more details on each of the episodes and people in the book.

97JayneCM
Editado: Fev 24, 4:55 pm



Book 18. Chai Time at Cinnamon Gardens by Shankari Chandran

February PrizeCAT - prize from your own country (winner 2023 Miles Franklin Award)


As the author says in the notes, cultural erasure, the appropriation of history and the rewriting of narratives happens all over the world and continues to happen.
There is so much to 'unpack' in this novel. At first it seems to be focusing on the plight of the elderly and the need to provide them with respect and dignity in their care. Cinnamon Gardens is owned by Sri Lankan immigrants and most of the residents are also South Asian. Gradually we learn more of their stories and their experiences and the atrocities committed during the civil war in Sri Lanka. After a certain incident, the novel shifts to the casual racism that exists throughout Australia and the ridiculousness that is so-called 'reverse racism' and the illogical arguments presented by its advocates.
The parts of the book relating to the 'incident' may be less accessible to some readers as it is quite Australian in its references. As an Australian, so much was instantly recognisable yet I am unsure it will translate to a wider audience as well.
Important issues aside, this was also an engaging read about love, grief, family, friendship, dignity, forgiveness, courage and sacrifice and you will fall in love with the characters, particularly sassy Maya.

98JayneCM
Editado: Fev 14, 5:24 am



Book 19. Extraordinary Birds by Sandy Stark McGinnis

February AlphaKIT - letter E


December knows a lot about birds. In fact, she knows she was born to fly and is just waiting for her wings to grow in so she can transform into a bird herself and fly away.
A book about hope and searching for a safe and happy space where you can be who you were meant to be.

99JayneCM
Fev 11, 5:39 am



Book 20. Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter

BingoDOG - set in multiple countries


A winged woman hatched from an egg telling her life story to a journalist for joins the circus to follow her around the world - this story should have captivated me from the beginning. But to me, it seemed to be a delirious, disjointed spiral into madness. Which again, would totally be for me. I am not discounting the possibility that I was just not 'feeling' this book now and a reread may have me singing its praises.

100DeltaQueen50
Fev 11, 4:50 pm

>99 JayneCM: I read Nights At the Circus last year and I also had some difficulty with the read, ultimately deciding that it wasn't the book for me.

101threadnsong
Fev 11, 8:14 pm

Hello and finally getting around to dropping by your 2024 thread! What a great set of challenges and categories you have set for yourself and I especially love the cereal box challenge. What a great idea!

I will be interested to read your review of "Princess of Cleves." It's been a while since I read it and can remember the details that have slipped my mind.

102JayneCM
Fev 12, 1:11 am

>100 DeltaQueen50: My review was somewhat ambiguous as I still cannot seem to articulate just what I feel about it. I am not normally put off by 'strange' books but this one just didn't grab me.

>101 threadnsong: Thanks for stopping by!

103pamelad
Fev 12, 2:31 pm

>99 JayneCM: It's many years since I read Nights at the Circus, but I remember the confusion and the chaos. I think I tried at least one other of Angela Carter's books, but didn't seek out any more. An author I read more of from that era is Fay Weldon.

104JayneCM
Fev 13, 12:09 am

>104 JayneCM: I quite enjoyed Angela Carter's short stories - maybe her style is better in small doses.
I have been meaning to read The Life and Loves of a She-Devil as I have never read any Fay Weldon.

105JayneCM
Editado: Fev 16, 11:52 pm



Book 21. House of Yesterday by Deeba Zargarpur

January AlphaKIT - letter Y


Firstly, the cover, absolutely stunning.
The book itself I would call a beautiful mess. The difficulties of immigrant families, the grief and trauma associated with divorcing parents, an aging grandmother suffering from dementia, coping with adolescence and friendships gone awry, all these topics were presented in a beautiful and compelling style. The paranormal aspect however seemed quite incoherent at times and cut into the flow of the present time narrative.
Overall, a good read and the ending was quite emotional.

106Zozette
Fev 13, 1:48 pm

I tried Nights at the Circus a while back but couldn’t get into it and I DNFed. I recently unhauled it and left it at a street library. Someone took it so I hope they enjoy it more than I did.

107JayneCM
Editado: Fev 19, 6:24 am



Book 22. A Wolf Called Wander by Roseanne Parry

February RandomKIT - escape or rescue


I always enjoy middle grade told from the viewpoint of an animal. And I love wolves. This is based on the true story of a journey taken by a lone wolf and how he found a new pack. Also includes interesting facts and photos at the end, both about the particular wolf and the animals and landscape in general.

108Jackie_K
Fev 14, 1:12 pm

>107 JayneCM: Oh, my 10 year old daughter loves wolves! (and has been writing a book about rival wolf packs). I'm going to see if I can get hold of this book for her.

109JayneCM
Fev 14, 7:39 pm

>108 Jackie_K: Writing a book! That's wonderful. I always feel that wolves get a bad rap so really enjoyed this one. Hope she enjoys it too.

110Jackie_K
Fev 15, 6:24 am

>109 JayneCM: To be fair, she has started hundreds and most don't get beyond the first few paragraphs (I wonder how many authors can relate to that?!). But the wolf one has made it to at least chapter 2, so we'll see how it goes. As far as I can tell it's fanfic inspired by Erin Hunter.

111JayneCM
Fev 15, 8:04 pm

>110 Jackie_K: Oooh, I have never seen Erin Hunter's books - they look great. Off to see if my library has them!
Hope the writing goes well.

112Jackie_K
Fev 16, 5:23 am

>111 JayneCM: my daughter is a big fan!

113Tess_W
Fev 16, 11:54 pm

>95 JayneCM: Sorry to hear of your disappointment. I have her White Teeth on my TBR and it does have mixed reviews.

114JayneCM
Editado: Fev 20, 6:55 am



Book 23. When He Was Wicked by Julia Quinn

February HistoryCAT - Georgian/Regency/Victorian Britain


Predictable but still fun. I enjoyed the earlier books more - Lady Whistledown is definitely the highlight of the series for me. This one was too descriptive in the steamy scenes for me, but still an entertaining enough read.

115christina_reads
Fev 17, 1:56 pm

>114 JayneCM: I've definitely had mixed results with the Bridgerton series -- I really enjoyed The Viscount Who Loved Me and To Sir Phillip, with Love, but the others were all varying degrees of meh.

116JayneCM
Fev 18, 4:44 am

>115 christina_reads: Definitely! But I will still finish the series as I am so close to the end now!

117JayneCM
Editado: Fev 27, 8:19 am



Book 24. Welcome To The Hyunam-dong Bookshop by Hwang Bo-reum

January CalendarCAT - published 17th January


Such a gentle and comforting read about making changes to your life and living a life that may not be 'successful' per society's terms but makes you happy. And set in a bookshop - what more could a book lover ask for?!

118LadyoftheLodge
Fev 19, 3:45 pm

>117 JayneCM: Thanks for the review. This is on my TBR for NetGalley.

119JayneCM
Editado: Fev 19, 10:27 pm

>117 JayneCM: The only thing I would say is some of the writing, particularly conversations, seems a bit stilted.
But the other day, totally unrelated to my reading of this book, my son and I were talking about language and Fifty Words For Snow that I borrowed from the library and he wondered which language has the most words. It is Korean (that is all Google called it, although I'm sure there are many dialects) with over a million words. With English only having about 170,000, it now makes sense why Korean books in translation always seem a bit stiff and clunky. We don't have enough words to convey what the author is writing in Korean.

120JayneCM
Editado: Fev 20, 6:42 pm



Book 25. The Fifth Child by Doris Lessing

February AlphaKIT - letter F


Ben, the fifth child, is certainly creepy in this story about a family and their pursuit of happiness and having a 'successful' family life. Is the arrival of Ben a punishment for being too happy, too self-satisfied, too complacent about the gorgeous children and idyllic family life they already had?
You will certainly question whether having children is worth it after reading about Ben!

121JayneCM
Fev 20, 6:46 pm



Book 26. The Greek Way by Edith Hamilton

February I Read Cereal Boxes board game - non fiction


An easily accessible work on Ancient Greece and the various elements that made it unique.
Ancient Greece culture/society comprised a balance that has rarely been seen again - between mind and spirit, the rights of the individual and the needs of the community, things seen and things not seen, fact and beauty.
This is not a scholarly work but that is what makes it so approachable for the everyday reader who simply wants to learn a little more about Ancient Greek culture.

122Tess_W
Fev 21, 4:40 am

>117 JayneCM: Not much!

123JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 4:04 am



Book 27. Longbourn: Dragon Entail by Maria Grace

February CalendarCAT - Year of the Dragon


So entertaining! Again, love the way the author weaves the happenings from Pride and Prejudice into the dragon world. This book ends with Lydia's elopement with Wickham, but for potentially dragon related reasons. Again, the variety of dragons is magnificent - the scene in which Elizabeth takes on a female cockatrice is simply superb. The incomparable Lizzy becomes even more imposing in this series - a force to be reckoned with indeed.

124JayneCM
Fev 27, 8:29 am



Book 28. Without Precedent by Owen Zupp

February Reading Through Time - Aquarius and amethyst


Written by Phillip Zupp's son, this is Phillip's life story, through growing up poor on a Queensland farm to his perseverance in becoming a fighter pilot in the Korean War. It is the story of the unknown (to the recipient) awarding of the US Purple Heart to an Australian pilot which led to his son attempting to follow the paper trail in hopes of seeing his father's medal finally awarded and officially recognised.
This would be of particular interest to an aviation enthusiast as there are numerous detailed descriptions of the missions flown by Zupp during the Korean War. But still an interesting read overall.

125JayneCM
Fev 29, 7:02 am

February reading:

4739 pages read

14 books read in the following formats:

3 Kindle Unlimited
10 library
1 Faded Page free ebook

126JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 4:00 am

My plan for March CATs, KITs and other reads

Read Around The World - Night Train To Marrakech by Dinah Jefferies (Morocco)
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 1. Brown cover - Outpost by Dan Richards
✅ I Read Cereal Boxes board game 2. Blue cover - Dead Voices by Katherine Arden
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 3. Sci fi - The Man Who Fell To Earth by Walter Tevis
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 4. Flowers on cover - After The Forest by Kell Woods
Reading Through Time - Medicine, epidemics and plagues - The Pull of the Stars by Emma Donoghue
BingoDOG - 1. - Read a CAT - The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall (January CalendarCAT - published 1st January 1928)
BingoDOG - 2. - a book featuring water - Dark Waters by Katherine Arden
CalendarCAT - The Bitter Glass by Eilís Dillon (author born March 7, 1920)
HistoryCAT - Science and medicine - The Radium Girls by Kate Moore
PrizeCAT - Prize that's new to you - Strange Weather in Tokyo by Hiromi Kawakami (winner 2001 Tanizaki Award)
RandomKIT - World Wildlife Day - Birds and Us by Tim Birkhead
AlphaKIT - For H - Bleak House by Charles Dickens
AlphaKIT - For R - The Ride of Her Life by Elizabeth Letts
MysteryKIT - Historical mysteries - The Body Under The Piano by Marthe Jocelyn
ScaredyKIT - True crime - The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer by Liza Rodman
SFFKIT - Space opera - Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente

Carry forward from January

SFFKIT - Epic fantasy - Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb

Carry forward from February

Read Around The World - The Life of Insects by Viktor Pelevin (Russia) -
I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 1. Classic square - The Princess of Cleves by Madame de La Fayette
I Read Cereal Boxes board game - 4. Book in translation - Oblomov by Ivan Goncharov
MysteryKIT - True unsolved mysteries - The Survival of the Princes in the Tower by Matthew Lewis
ScaredyKIT - Gothic - The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole
SFFKIT - Critters and creatures - Netherfield: Rogue Dragon by Maria Grace

I am halfway through both Oblomov and The Survival of the Princes in the Tower - the shorter month caught me out!

127JayneCM
Mar 2, 4:04 am



March 2024

29. Dead Voices by Katherine Arden - finished 1st March 2024 - March I Read Cereal Boxes board game - blue cover

29/211 = 13.74%

Read Around The World 1/12 = 8.33%
I Read Cereal Boxes board game 7/48 = 14.58% Dead Voices
Reading Through Time = 3/16 = 18.75%
BingoDOG 4/25 = 16%
CalendarCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
HistoryCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
PrizeCAT 2/12 = 16.67%
RandomKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
AlphaKIT 4/26 = 15.38%
MysteryKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
ScaredyKIT 1/12 = 8.33%
SFFKIT 0/12 = 0%

128JayneCM
Editado: Mar 2, 4:23 am



Book 29. Dead Voices by Katherine Arden

March I Read Cereal Boxes board game - blue cover


"Ghosts like it when you're afraid. It means you acknowledge them."

Creepy and chilling, just like the first book in the series. The friendship between the three main characters is inspiring and would be very encouraging for middle grade readers, especially as Coco was able to be the hero of this story.