Google translate and language

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Google translate and language

1timspalding
Editado: Dez 28, 2016, 8:49 am

I thought this was interesting, and worth sharing, but couldn't decide if it should go in the language group or the programmers group. So, Off-topic.

I've been playing with Google Translate as a language-teaching tool, trying to learn new constructions in Turkish. I'm working on things that would be subordinate clauses in English, but tend to turn out very differently in Turkish. The trick is, when I make trivial changes in the English—swapping out one noun for another of the same type—the Turkish often changes constructions completely.

I cooked up a nice example—the same English sentence "I love to go to X," with five different cities as X.



It's a nifty example of how Google works—as I understand it—calculating the statistics of usage as best it can, with no "grammar" underneath, or attempt at consistency.

It also in a few interesting directions, for example, to a recent controversy over gender in such systems. Someone noticed that the Turkish (again) for "O bir doktor" and "O bir hemşire" translate as "He is a doctor" but "She is a nurse," although Turkish "O" is ambiguous between he and she. So long as translation systems are based on real-world usage, not rules, they will continue to go with the flow, whether it's trivial differences in construction or real-world sexism. But we are probably stuck here, insofar as it was the move away from rule-base systems that gave computer science its long-awaited breakthrough in AI translation.

I also translated "I love X" from English into Turkish. Most names used "sevmek," the unmarked word for love. But some, especially foreign male names, used bayilmak, which means, literally, "to black out" or "faint." Thus, you may love Zaynep, but John makes you weak in the knees!

2bnielsen
Dez 28, 2016, 7:48 am

>1 timspalding: Very nice! Thanks for sharing.

3Cynfelyn
Out 22, 2022, 7:02 pm

>1 timspalding: "Someone noticed that the Turkish (again) for "O bir doktor" and "O bir hemşire" translate as "He is a doctor" but "She is a nurse," although Turkish "O" is ambiguous between he and she."

For an example from TV, from High Valerian (Game of thrones, season 7, ep. 3, broadcast July 2017) see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoTn9enVtAM, starting 01.10.

4WholeHouseLibrary
Out 22, 2022, 11:21 pm

Brain. Hurts.

5Helen0999
Editado: Fev 10, 2023, 10:35 am

Este utilizador foi removido como sendo spam.

6TADCfan
Dez 10, 2023, 1:19 pm

i know russian and ukrainian.i am still learning english tho