DisassemblyOfReason's 2014 reading

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DisassemblyOfReason's 2014 reading

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1DisassemblyOfReason
Editado: Jan 30, 2014, 9:25 pm

I think I can do this, as long as I have audiobooks available.

Completed since 1 January 2014:

  1. Maintainable JavaScript by Nicholas Zakas (first time through)

    Brief, but I think it's useful.

  2. Escape to Witch Mountain by Alexander Key, read by Marc Thompson

    Listening to the audio version this time made me realize how short this is.

  3. Changes by Jim Butcher, read by James Marsters

    Marsters is a very good reader for this series. I think the publishers made a mistake when they changed readers for the book after this (Ghost Story: a novel of the Dresden Files, the only entry in the series not read by Marsters), although they did change back after that.

  4. Side Jobs by Jim Butcher, read by James Marsters

    Short story collection, set in the world of the Dresden Files.

  5. Thraxas and the Dance of Death by Martin Scott (first time through)

  6. Windhaven by George R.R. Martin and Lisa Tuttle, read by Harriet Walter

    This is a collection of linked novellas, some of which were published separately before this collection was published. The collection was the 2nd of GRRM's books (years before A Game of Thrones came out), and the first of LT's.

    Harriet Walter's performance is excellent, as always.

  7. Thraxas at War by Martin Scott (first time through)

  8. The silver ship and the sea by Brenda Cooper, read by Lauren Fortgang

    Fortgang's performance is good. The 2nd and 3rd volumes in the series, which I have not yet listened to, split the narration between Fortgang and a male narrator, as the viewpoint is shared between the original female narrator of the first book, her brother, and their four companions.

  9. The dead in their vaulted arches by C. Alan Bradley, read by Jayne Entwistle (first time through)

  10. Thraxas Under Siege by Martin Scott (first time through)

  11. Life in a Medieval Village by Frances Gies and Joseph Gies (first time through)

  12. The Barsoom Project by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes, read by Stefan Rudnicki

  13. Thraxas and the Ice Dragon by Martin Scott (first time through)

  14. The California Voodoo Game by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes, read by Stefan Rudnicki

  15. Trigger & Friends by James Schmitz, edited by Eric Flint and Guy Gordon

  16. Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L. Sayers, read by Ian Carmichael

  17. Unnatural Death by Dorothy L. Sayers, read by Ian Carmichael

  18. The Moon Maze Game by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes, read by Stefan Rudnicki

  19. The Outlaw's Tale by Margaret Frazer

  20. The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club by Dorothy L. Sayers

    Beware if you're looking into acquiring an audio download of this one - there are 2 audio downloads with very similar covers available, both starring Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter, but one is the BBC radio dramatization while the other is the unabridged audiobook. At the moment, the unabridged audiobook is available on audible.co.uk but only the dramatization is available on audible.com.

  21. The Five Red Herrings by Dorothy L. Sayers (first time through)

    This also completes the omnibus Lord Peter Takes the Case.

    As far as I can tell, there's only one unabridged audiobook of The Five Red Herrings, and it doesn't seem to be available in anything but cassette format, and isn't available as an audio download. It seems to be highly recommended, particularly since the narrator (Patrick Malahide) is very good at making the 6 suspects distinct characters, a problem which has been known to give readers trouble.

    I rather liked this one. I tend to like books that involve painters and painting, although I don't paint myself, and all six suspects, together with the victim, are painters, and the investigation involves a lot of watching the suspects work and trying to figure out which one forged a painting in the victim's style as part of an effort to fake an alibi.

  22. Living in Threes by Judith Tarr, read by Emma Galvin (first time through recording)

  23. Murder Must Advertise by Dorothy L. Sayers, read by Ian Carmichael

2wookiebender
Jan 17, 2014, 7:13 am

Welcome to the group! And we have no rules, so however you want to count to 100 is fine. :)

Good to see that Marsters returns to reading the Dresden Files, I'd heard he'd stopped at some stage, and Don is most happy to hear it was only for one book.

3jfetting
Jan 17, 2014, 9:52 am

Welcome to the group! I always count audiobooks, too.

4judylou
Editado: Jan 22, 2014, 5:28 pm

Audio books are still books. Doesn't matter whether you use your eyes or ears, you are still reading. Welcome to the group, and I love your username!

5wareagle78
Jan 24, 2014, 2:26 pm

Wow, you're making great progress! I will enjoy following your journey.

6DisassemblyOfReason
Editado: Mar 11, 2014, 7:35 pm

Works completed in February:
24. The Attenbury Emeralds by Jill Paton Walsh, read by Edward Petherbridge

This is one of Paton Walsh's sequels to Dorothy L. Sayers' Lord Peter Wimsey series. This is the third such sequel, but the first to have no input from the original author.

25. Dragon by Steven Brust, read by Bernard Setaro Clark

26. Strong Poison by Dorothy L. Sayers

27. Whose Body? by Dorothy L. Sayers, read by Nadia May

Nadia May is ordinarily a very good narrator. At the beginning of the book, however, she initially gives Lord Peter an odd vocal interpretation. The narration steadies down not long after that, though.

28. Iorich by Steven Brust, read by Bernard Setaro Clark

29. Orca by Steven Brust, read by Bernard Setaro Clark

30. Red Land, Black Land: Daily Life in Ancient Egypt by Barbara Mertz, read by Lorna Raver

31. The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis, read by Kenneth Branagh

32. Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers, read by Ian Carmichael

33. The Serpent's Shadow by Mercedes Lackey, read by Michelle Ford

34. Phoenix and Ashes by Mercedes Lackey, read by Michelle Ford

35. Reserved for the Cat by Mercedes Lackey, read by Mirabai Galashan

36. The Wizard of London by Mercedes Lackey, read by Michelle Ford

37. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart, read by Del Roy

38. The Devil's Novice by Ellis Peters, read by Patrick Tull

39. Summoned to Destiny, edited by Julie Czerneda

40. The Horse and His Boy by C.S. Lewis, read by Alex Jennings

41. The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis, read by Jeremy Northam

42. Kitty Goes to Washington by Carrie Vaughn, read by Marguerite Gavin

43. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis, read by Michael York

44. The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis, read by Patrick Stewart

45. A Late Phoenix by Catherine Aird, read by Robin Bailey

46. Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis, read by Lynn Redgrave

47. Parting Breath by Catherine Aird, read by Robin Bailey

48. The Stately Home Murder by Catherine Aird, read by Robin Bailey

49. Sparkling Cyanide by Agatha Christie, read by Robin Bailey

50. Have His Carcase by Dorothy L. Sayers

51. A princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs

52. Death Comes as the End by Agatha Christie, read by Emilia Fox

53. The Odyssey by Homer, read by John Lescault

54. A wizard of Mars by Diane Duane, read by Christina Moore

55. The Clocks by Agatha Christie, read by Robin Bailey

56. By the Light of the Moon by Dean Koontz, read by Stephen Lang

57. Star Born by Andre Norton

58. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl, read by Eric Idle

59. The Tuesday Club Murders by Agatha Christie, read by Joan Hickson

60. Miss Marple's Final Cases by Agatha Christie, read by Joan Hickson and Isla Blair

61. Wizard's Holiday by Diane Duane, read by Christina Moore

62. Destination Unknown by Agatha Christie, read by Emilia Fox

7Helenliz
Fev 4, 2014, 4:14 pm

6> what did you think of that one? The synopsis is an interesting one, as Sayers includes reference to the Attenbury Emeralds as Wimsey's first case in several of her Wimsey books, but gives few real details as to the case itself. I wonder how that all hangs together.

8DisassemblyOfReason
Fev 4, 2014, 7:56 pm

>7 Helenliz: Re: The Attenbury Emeralds by Jill Paton Walsh

I give Paton Walsh credit - she takes both the reference to the Attenbury Emeralds from Whose Body? and the reference to the Attenbury diamonds from "The Article in Question" and creates a backstory that deals with both incidents, rather than treating either reference as an error.

However, the backstory is handled by telling, rather than showing - first by Lord Peter and Bunter telling the story of the original Attenbury Emeralds case(s) to Harriet (multiple incidents were involved, years apart). This part falls a bit flat - it's not given in flashback but told as a story by Peter and Bunter in 1950, about events that happened decades before.

The story was brought to mind by the obituary of the late Lord Attenbury, which then naturally leads to the new Lord Attenbury having concerns about death duties and raising the money to pay them, which in turn leads to a new problem for Lord Peter. The story becomes more interesting here, I think - there is a question about the provenance of one of the items, and various opportunities have existed over the years to cloud the issue.

The more contemporary parts - the present day of 1950 - have more substance to them. Some important Wimsey family events that aren't tied directly to the main plot occur as well, but I can't really go into that without rather massive spoilers.

The storytelling style isn't like Sayers' Harriet Vane books - she isn't really the viewpoint character for a lot of it, although she is present for the 1950 case. It also isn't like Lord Peter's point of view in earlier stories, either - we are hearing the story being told by him, not given his point of view directly.

I liked the book all right. I'm particularly fond of Edward Petherbridge's performances as Lord Peter, and he's good at narrating this one.

9DisassemblyOfReason
Editado: Abr 26, 2014, 3:38 am

Works completed in March:

63. Kitty Goes to War by Carrie Vaughn, read by Marguerite Gavin

64. Kitty and the Silver Bullet by Carrie Vaughn, read by Marguerite Gavin

65. Lilith: A Snake in the Grass by Jack L. Chalker

66. Kitty and the Dead Man's Hand by Carrie Vaughn, read by Marguerite Gavin

67. Kitty Steals the Show by Carrie Vaughn, read by Marguerite Gavin

68. Protector by C.J. Cherryh, read by Daniel Thomas May

69. A Wizard Alone by Diane Duane, read by Christina Moore

70. Rainbow's End by Ellis Peters, read by Simon Prebble

71. The Wizard's Dilemma by Diane Duane

72. Ghost Story by Jim Butcher, read by John Glover

73. Goblin Moon by Teresa Edgerton

74. Assassin's Apprentice by Robin Hobb, read by Paul Boehmer

75. It's in His Kiss by Julia Quinn, read by Simon Prebble

76. Land Beyond the Map by Kenneth Bulmer

77. The Candle in the Wind by T.H. White, read by Neville Jason

78. The Book of Merlyn by T.H. White, read by Neville Jason

79. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, read by Terry Jones

80. The Key to Venudine by Kenneth Bulmer

81. The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman, read by cast

82. Scandal Takes a Holiday by Lindsey Davis, read by Jamie Glover

83. The Accusers by Lindsey Davis, read by Jamie Glover

84. Uller Uprising by H. Beam Piper, read by B.J. Harrison

85. Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett, read by Stephen Briggs

86. The Subtle Knife by Phillip Pullman, read by cast

87. The Amber Spyglass by Phillip Pullman, read by cast

88. A Study in Sorcery, by Michael Kurland, read by John Mawson

89. I Am Half-Sick of Shadows by C. Alan Bradley, read by Jayne Entwistle

90. A Midsummer Tempest by Poul Anderson

91. Snuff by Terry Pratchett, read by Stephen Briggs

92. Unseen Academicals by Terry Pratchett, read by Stephen Briggs

93. Murder in Montparnasse by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

94. Fugitive of the Stars by Edmond Hamilton (also completes omnibus Land Beyond the Map/Fugitive of the Stars

95. Grave Peril by Jim Butcher, read by James Marsters

96. The Devil's code by John Sandford, read by Richard Ferrone

97. Ride Proud, Rebel! by Andre Norton

98. Brother Cadfael's Penance by Ellis Peters, read by Stephen Thorne

99. Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones, read by Jenny Sterling

100. Death Before Wicket by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

101. Yurth Burden by Andre Norton

102. Urn Burial by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

103. The Hanged Man's Song by John Sandford, read by Richard Ferrone

104. The Devil's code (abridged) by John Sandford, read by Frank Muller

Works completed in April:

105. Rebel Spurs by Andre Norton
Haven't read this before. It reminds me of the family relationship plot of The Beast Master by the same author, which has some similarities in general outline. (Supposedly orphaned young man, raised by maternal grandfather, went to war some years ago against his grandfather's wishes. Grandfather died while he was away, and the old world was swept away by the war. Afterward, the young man learned that what he'd been told about his parents' deaths was not the whole story...)

106. Peacemaker by C. J. Cherryh, read by Daniel Thomas May
The shadow guild problem in this book seemed a bit flat, but the book as a whole was enjoyable.

107. Pyramids by Terry Pratchett, read by Nigel Planer
I'm more familiar with Stephen Briggs as a narrator of the Discworld novels, but I finally decided to give Planer a try - especially since he is the *only* narrator available, as far as I know, for many of them. He's good.

108. Stranger at the Wedding by Barbara Hambly, read by Anne Flosnik

109. Search the Seven Hills by Barbara Hambly, read by Clive Chafer (first time through)

110. Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

111. Shadows by Robin McKinley (first time through)

112. Death by Water by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

113. Flying Too High by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

114. The sibyl in her grave by Sarah Caudwell, read by Eva Haddon (first time through)
Something of a downer ending compared to the other Hilary Tamar mysteries.

115. The shortest way to Hades by Sarah Caudwell, read by Eva Haddon

116. The Castlemaine Murders by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

117. The gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (first time through)

118. Mairelon the Magician by Patricia Wrede (first time through)

119. Murder in the Dark by Kerry Greenwood, read by Stephanie Daniel

120. Wizards at war by Diane Duane, read by Christina Moore

121. How To Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell, read by Gerard Doyle

122. Magician's Ward by Patricia Wrede (this also completes the omnibus Magic and Malice)

123. The Franchise Affair (abridged) by Josephine Tey, read by Edward Petherbridge

124. The gazebo by Patricia Wentworth, read by Diana Bishop

125. Lost Cities and Vanished Civilizations by Robert Silverberg (first time through)

126. To Ruin a Queen by Fiona Buckley, read by Nadia May

127. Chapter and hearse and other mysteries by Catherine Aird, read by Bruce Montague

128. Henrietta Who? by Catherine Aird, read by Robin Bailey

129. The Rose Rent by Ellis Peters, read by Patrick Tull

130. When in Rome by Ngaio Marsh, read by James Saxon