Mark Steyn for Senate

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Mark Steyn for Senate

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1enevada
Ago 17, 2013, 10:05am

I don't see any down side to this:

http://steynforsenate.com/

2MMcM
Ago 17, 2013, 4:02pm

You have to believe that the 17th Amendment eliminated the citizenship requirement.

3enevada
Ago 17, 2013, 5:14pm

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each state, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each Senator shall have one vote. The electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislatures.

When vacancies happen in the representation of any state in the Senate, the executive authority of such state shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies: Provided, that the legislature of any state may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until the people fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct.

This amendment shall not be so construed as to affect the election or term of any Senator chosen before it becomes valid as part of the Constitution.


Looks wide open to me. Wonder what Scalia would say...

4MMcM
Editado: Ago 17, 2013, 10:59pm

Preceding that.
That in lieu of the first paragraph of section three of Article I of the Constitution of the United States, and in lieu of so much of paragraph two of the same section as relates to the filling of vacancies, the following be proposed as an amendment to the Constitution, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the States:

No mention of the third paragraph.

5Bretzky1
Ago 17, 2013, 11:01pm

The 17th Amendment did not change the requirement that to be eligible to be a Senator a person must be a US citizen at least nine years prior to their election. All the 17th Amendment did was to change the manner in which Senators are elected. That is to say that it removed the power of electing Senators from the state legislatures and gave it to the people. Of course, the 17th Amendment merely formalized what was already happening in practice as nearly every state was already holding elections for Senators, the results of which state legislators ignored at their electoral peril.