Arts graduates - anyone employed in a job related to their degree?

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Arts graduates - anyone employed in a job related to their degree?

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1sorlil
Maio 18, 2007, 10:39am

After getting a 1st in politics/classics the only job I could find was call centre work for a year. I then did a masters in philosophy and I'm back in the position of looking for a job. Are arts degrees only good for academia?

2mrsradcliffe
Maio 19, 2007, 5:19am

I'm training to become a librarian. I need to learn Latin though and finding it really hard!
I want to probably work in academic libraries. It's not the same as being an academic, so don't do it if that's the career you want! I've chosen this path as I would prefer to help unite people with information and train others in the use of digital resources, then be under pressure to publish etc.
I love books and protecting collections, safeguarding the rights to intellectual freedom and working in a library building. And I am still doing arts courses with the OU and learning languages, as well as the opportunities for continuing professional development.
So there is plenty of scope for lifelong learning!

PS I worked in a call centre for a while after graduating.

3LittleKnife
Maio 19, 2007, 11:18am

I have a Classics Masters and am about to embark on PhD - I manage a pub, sometimes its remarkable useful but not directly related.
I dont know anyone who did my sort of degree who did something related but is not an academic or a teacher, in fact those professions aside I dont know anyone who has said their Arts degree was even useful for their job (mind you I know very few scientists who use their degree - just more than the artsy ppl).
its fun though...

4sorlil
Maio 23, 2007, 3:10am

Thanks, I beginning to think library science is the way to go to get a job though running a pub sounds more fun!

5Sniv
Maio 23, 2007, 4:56pm

I majored in film in my undergrad and got a job in tv afterward. That was fun. Now I'm on the academic track. If it doesn't work out, I'll go back to tv. I really have no idea what someone does with a philosophy degree outside academia. Perhaps one of your advisors could help you? I remember when I was an English major (briefly) they had a pamphlet entitled: "What do you do with an English degree?"

6mrsradcliffe
Maio 31, 2007, 9:06am

PPS I have a BA in English Literature.

7smfmpls
Jun 14, 2007, 7:21pm

I'm almost done with my history degree and I work at a history museum. So it happens sometimes!

8petescisco
Jul 3, 2007, 8:19pm

I've worked as a writer and editor since getting my M.A. in English, and as a bookstore clerk before that. I'm going into a PhD program because I've got one more career in me, and I'd like it to be as a college-level writing and lit professor. So I need the credentials (I did teach for a while at the community college level.) So, yeah, do what you love and what you trained yourself to do. A humanities degree is a liberating degree, but it's also a difficult one -- you often have to create a career from nothing but your training and experience in communication, critical thinking, and analysis. I wouldn't trade my M.A. for an M.B.A. for all the tea in wherever it is that keeps a lot of tea these days. Most civilizations aren't remembered for their spreadsheets as much as for their literature.

9januaryw
Jul 24, 2007, 9:39am

I am getting a social work degree and I answer the phone line in a crisis center. I manage to work full time by working the graveyard shift!

10varielle
Jul 24, 2007, 9:58am

I got a masters in history and made a career in human resources. It's interesting that I've met a number of history majors and others with liberal arts degrees in this field. English and philosophy majors turn up frequently. Quite a few tried their hand at teaching (self included) and decided it wasn't for them.

11acksaysbillthecat Primeira Mensagem
Editado: Out 12, 2007, 10:43pm

Mensagem removida pelo autor.

12medievalmama
Mar 11, 2008, 4:58pm

I've taught, marketed, worked for a book wholesaler, worked in a library in a variety of non-librarian positions, run a food stand inside a bar, and written for a variety of organizations and people. I think that the Arts degrees give anyone a great deal of flexibility and to cite scriveners_lot, "you often have to create a career from nothing but your training and experience in communication, critical thinking, and analysis". Scientists, nurses, lawyers, adminstrators, marketers, programmers all have to communicate.

13countrypie
Editado: Jul 2, 2008, 12:43pm

>"I wouldn't trade my M.A. for an M.B.A. for all the tea in wherever it is that keeps a lot of tea these days. Most civilizations aren't remembered for their spreadsheets as much as for their literature."

Thanks for that scriveners_lot, I never thought of it like that before.

Mine was a B.A. in English and History. My partners' was a B.A. in English and History with Hons. in Creative Writing. The few jobs we can find that relate to these degrees haven't appealed to either of us, so we've settled on short-term jobs in the hospitality industry while we figure out what to do.

I've tried to look at teaching as an occupation but it's just not me. I don't really want to get stuck in an admin type job but it might be an option for a while..

I've had a look at getting into the public service but it looks pretty competitive and I feel too young to do that kind of job (I'm 22). I'd rather do something more creative.

I think working in a book shop would be good, but it's not exactly highly paid.

The main problem I find is that my B.A. was so interesting and stimulating, and flexible, that most jobs look frighteningly boring and claustrophobic in comparison. :-(

I think you're correct tho medievalmama - with these types of degrees it's probably not about finding a job, its more about creating the right job for yourself through smart thinking.

14medievalmama
Jul 14, 2008, 9:47pm

I freelanced for a long time, probably too long. I still take an occasional freelance project -- I've had 2 this summer. It keeps life exciting and there are lots of people who CANNOT WRITE who will hire you to make their words pretty -- or even to make their words make sense. Some of those jobs are boring. Some are fascinating because I get to learn new stuff about fields and industries I knew nothing about. I also did temp work at the administrative assistant level twice for 3 years each between longer term jobs -- graduate school taught me to type and organize as well as to write.

15oldtrustylegs
Ago 30, 2008, 2:43pm

I have a BA in History, which gets you absolutely nowhere in the field. I went into that major knowing I was going to go on to my MA and PhD, though, so I wasn't surprised when I couldn't get a job right out of undergrad. A paying job, that is, I could have found any number of volunteer/internship positions.

16kiwiflowa
Out 3, 2008, 7:00am

What about public service / politics?... US Department of State? I don't know what country you are in I assume the US?

Just responding to this comment:

"The main problem I find is that my B.A. was so interesting and stimulating, and flexible, that most jobs look frighteningly boring and claustrophobic in comparison. :-("

I know how you feel I once felt exactly the same...

I'm about your age and have have a BA in History and Politics. I have a full time office admin job and I study part time. The office job is at an academic institution so it's a bit interesting in that respect but of course it's not what I ultimately want to do (whatever that is). But this is what I think - it does pay the bills, my perks relating to my study is fantastic and it gives me experience, it's what I call my first 'real' job. I learned a lot in good work ethics and administration in this job. I feel very confident in my abilities now and have several avenues I want to explore. The time I have worked here has also allowed me to relax (salary - woohoo!) find my bearings after full time study and 'find out' what I would like to do. I agree that you have to make your niche. I think a lot of what I want to do will begin in my time off and probably unpaid and who knows when that will lead to my fantastic dream job?

I guess what I'm trying to say is that any job after University is good. Ones that seem claustrophobic or boring might not be. :)

17r0lan6
Jan 28, 2009, 3:59pm

Mensagem removida pelo autor.