Who Translated the 1911 Everyman's Library War and Peace?

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Who Translated the 1911 Everyman's Library War and Peace?

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1civitas
Set 11, 2011, 6:02pm

Can someone identify the translator of the Everyman's Library 1911 edition of War and Peace?
The current edition uses the Maude translation, while the 1911 edition does thank the original
publisher for use of the translation, but doesn't bother to credit the translator.

Here's the 1st paragraph from the 1911 edition:

"Well, prince, what did I tell you? Genoa and Lucca have become the property of the Bonapartes.
Now, I give you fair warning, you will forfeit your position as my friend--as my faithful slave,
as you choose to say--if you persist in disbelieving in war, and are still determined to defend
all the horrors and atrocities perpetrated by this Antichrist--for that he is Antichrist I am
convinced!--Well, well, and now you are my dear friend? I see I have quite frightened you. Come,
sit down and chat."

Note: This pargraph is translated into English - it's originally in French not Russian

Here are two possible translators I know about (I don't have access to the texts to check):

Translator: Clara Bell (1887) Frence to English
Translator: Nathan Haskell Dole (1889)

These two I think are eliminated:
Translator: Leo Wiener (1904) - the French passages were left untranslated
Translator: Constance Garnet (1904) - translation doesn't match:

"Well, PRINCE, Genoa and Lucca are now no more than private estates of the Bonaparte family.
No, I warn you, that if you do not tell me we are at war, if you again allow yourself to
palliate all the infamies and atrocities of this Antichrist (upon my word, I believe he is),
I don't know you in future, you are no longer my friend, no longer my faithful slave, as you
say. There, how do you do, how do you do? I see I'm scaring you, sit down and talk to me."

Thanks.

2PimPhilipse
Set 12, 2011, 3:20am

Dole's transalation can be found at http://www.archive.org/details/warandpeace01dolegoog and starts with:

"Well, prince, Genoa and Lucca are now nothing more
than the apanages, than the private property of the Bonaparte
family. I warn you that if you do not tell me we are going
to have war, if you still allow yourself to condone all the
infamies, all the atrocities of this Antichrist — on my word I
believe he is Antichrist — -.that is the end of our acquaintance ;
you are no longer ray friend, you are no longer my faithful
slave, as you caJl yourself.* Now, be of good courage, I see
I frighten you. Come, sit down and tell me all about it."

So that doesn't match either.

3PimPhilipse
Set 12, 2011, 3:30am

Here's Bell's translation from http://www.archive.org/details/warpeacehistoric01tols

"Well, Prince, what did I tell you? Genoa and
Lucca have become the property of the Bonapartes.
Now, T give you fair warning, you will forfeit your
ivosition as my friend — as my faithful slave, as you
choose to say — if you persist in disbelieving in war and
are still determined to defend all the horrors and atrojD-
ities perpetrated by this Antichrist — for that he is
Antichrist I am convinced ! — Well, well, and now you
are my dear friend ? I see I have quite frightened you.
Come, sit down and chat."

This appears to be what you're after.

4civitas
Set 12, 2011, 8:26pm

>3 PimPhilipse:: Thanks PimPhilipse.

I'm a bit disappointed. I collect Everyman's Library and I like to read the books I collect. This translation being the English translation of a French tranlation is probably not the one to read.

5Phocion
Set 12, 2011, 9:03pm

I've been told the more recent Everyman's Library hard cover editions use the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation, which retains the "Eh bien, mon prince..." opening.

6DanMat
Editado: Set 13, 2011, 11:18am

This 1911 edition has gone from Russian into French by--according to the title page--"a Russian Lady", then from the French into English by Clara Bell.

There weren't many translators of Russian at the time. Though looking at this one is interesting...

Go for the Maudes or Ann Dunnigan.

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