The Best One Volume Book of Catholic Apologetics

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The Best One Volume Book of Catholic Apologetics

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1campusdan
Jun 10, 2011, 6:22pm

I have found one of the most used books of my library when confronted/challenged on many Catholic beliefs, especially from the anti-religious bias that is so prevalent today, is a book called Handbook of Christian Apologetics by Peter Kreeft and Ronald K. Tacelli It covers so many topics at such depth, such as Arguments for the Existence of God, The Problem of Evil, The Divinity of Christ, The Bible: Myth or History, Christianity and Other Religions, and Objective Truth and much more too.

In my opinion this is a must have for every apologetics library.

22wonderY
Jun 11, 2011, 3:52pm

Hey, I think that one is reposing in a stack on my bedside table. I've been trying to read some of Kreeft's other books in the last couple of years, and I find him much easier to take as a recorded lecturer. His question and answer format annoys me. Just get on with it! I say.

His Modern Scholar lectures are good enough to listen to multiple times.

3rgarcia149
Jun 12, 2011, 11:33am

Peter Kreeft is one of the great Catholic apologetic writers of recent times. He is an eager follower of C.S. Lewis. Have the volume in my library.

4Artaban
Editado: Dez 14, 2011, 9:44pm

I agree w/2wonderY as re; Q&A formats. I understand the methodology but I don't like reading it through that way...seems more like a reference manual, but I suppose that is the intent: to make it a reference tool.

5cynthrip
Jul 11, 2011, 6:01pm

Usually when I need a reference book for apologetics I turn to a specialty book. (For example: Answering Jehovah's Witnesses or Beginning Apologetics.)

6yinekka
Jul 15, 2011, 9:39am

Thank heaven! I thought I was the only one who was irritated by his Q&A format. Kreeft's Choices is my favourite of those of his I have read. Karl Keating's Catholicism and Fundamentalism would be one of the best books on apologetics I have read.

7LesMiserables
Editado: Jul 6, 2015, 8:14am

3.

Agreed. Aquinas' Summa in a nutshell.

8eschator83
Dez 5, 2016, 6:25pm

I write in the hope that others will re-enter this "conversation,"and especially to provide encouragement to look at sections they feel are valuable and important.
I've been struggling with this book for several years, enjoying it and feeling there is much of value here, but wishing Dr Kreeft had somehow found a way to "call" me more effectively into the issues he raises--or perhaps more precisely, suggests answers.
Once I get thinking about some question or challenge about Christianity, I usually quickly recall this book and pull it out. But seldom can I keep on reading, whether I find what I was hoping to or not. Nevertheless, I soon find myself back here again, and hope readers will share what they find of most value.
Perhaps it's worthwhile confronting the Q?A issue. I suspect most readers were quite stunned, as I was, to find the discussion questions listed on p 25, the end of Chapter 1, which had started on page 13. I thought: there is no way he answered these questions. And if he did, why does he think I should discuss them?
Worse, as I looked at the questions, most were compound, and some were so complex as to make the precise number of questions difficult to ascertain. There are more than 50 questions (in the 14). Let me give you a flavor of them.
1-What is apologetics? What is religion? What is their relation?
2-Is there anything distinctively Christian about apologetics? Why or why not? Do all religions include apologetics? Why or why not?
Perhaps you get the idea. Do you believe in 13 pages Dr Kreeft provided answers for the 50 +?
I hope some readers would be willing to share the answers they found to these questions--there are lots more at the end of each of 15 chapters (32 at the last), but you may be relieved to know chapter 16 has none at the end. Who was the Scholar who said you should always leave students with questions leading to more learning?

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