Why Darwin Matters

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Why Darwin Matters

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1Bakari
Ago 19, 2006, 4:14pm

Just want to give a plug for a new book by Micheal Shermer titled, Why Darwin Matters: the Case Against Intelligent Design. Shermer's books are typically lucid and thoughtful, and for anyone wanting to read books that explain evolution or arguments for it, Shermer provides a good place to begin. This is not a book I think for those who are already well read on the subject.

I'd be interested in reading and discussing this new book with others.

2BruceAir
Editado: Ago 20, 2006, 6:14pm

The opinion in the Dover, PA case (Case 4:04-cv-02688-JEJ) involving ID makes excellent reading on this topic. It's available in PDF form at:

http://www.pamd.uscourts.gov/kitzmiller/kitzmiller_342.pdf#search=%22related%3Aw...

The opinion focuses on the issue at hand--whether the Dover, PA school boad violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. But the judge provides a lucid review of opposition to Darwinian theory and patiently and clearly demolishes the underpinnings of ID. For example, the judge provides a history of the ID movement beginning on page 24.

I enjoy Michael Shermer's books. But this is one (ahem) case where primary sources are especially illuminating and useful.

3psiloiordinary
Editado: Out 8, 2006, 9:26am

This is really worth working your way through.

Fascinating insight into not only the argument but the US legal system as well.

Thanks for the tip.

4BruceAir
Nov 15, 2007, 6:27pm

The latest program from Nova on PBS is Intelligent Design on Trial. It's a very well-done (if a bit depressing) report on the Dover, PA case.

You can learn more about the program on its Web site:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/id/

5BruceAir
Dez 22, 2007, 12:27pm

I just finished Monkey Girl: Evolution, Education, Religion, and the Battle for America's Soul by Edward Humes. It's a riveting account of the events leading up to Kitzmiller v. Dover and the trial itself.

It's essential reading on the subject, and I especially recommend the Epilogue.