Picture of author.

Betty Radice (1912–1985)

Autor(a) de Early Greek Philosophy

11+ Works 1,084 Membros 8 Reviews 1 Favorited

About the Author

Image credit: Wikipedia

Obras de Betty Radice

Early Greek Philosophy (1987) 827 cópias, 5 resenhas
Who's Who in the Ancient World (1971) 248 cópias, 3 resenhas
Beowulf 1 exemplar(es)
Anthology Of Chinese Literature (1967) 1 exemplar(es)
The Epic of Gilgamesh (1960) 1 exemplar(es)
Homer The Odyssey 1 exemplar(es)
MENCIUS 1 exemplar(es)
The Dhammapada 1 exemplar(es)
Early Christian writings 1 exemplar(es)
The Greek Anthology 1 exemplar(es)

Associated Works

The Aeneid (0029) — Editor, algumas edições23,257 cópias, 197 resenhas
The Oresteia: Agamemnon / The Libation Bearers / The Eumenides (0458) — Editor, algumas edições10,356 cópias, 69 resenhas
The History of the Peloponnesian War (0400) — Tradutor, algumas edições7,971 cópias, 59 resenhas
The Analects (0070) — Editor, algumas edições6,193 cópias, 59 resenhas
On the Nature of Things (0054) — Editor, algumas edições5,320 cópias, 46 resenhas
The History of the Church: From Christ to Constantine (0321) — Editor, algumas edições4,287 cópias, 27 resenhas
Elogio da Loucura (1509) — Tradutor, algumas edições4,010 cópias, 54 resenhas
The Annals of Tacitus (0117) — Editor, algumas edições3,883 cópias, 31 resenhas
The Upanishads (1884) — Editor, algumas edições3,466 cópias, 20 resenhas
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1788) — Editor, algumas edições3,294 cópias, 43 resenhas
The Anabasis [in translation] (0370)algumas edições2,417 cópias, 51 resenhas
The Letters of Abelard and Heloise (1133) — Tradutor, algumas edições2,387 cópias, 10 resenhas
The Satires of Juvenal (0127) — Editor, algumas edições1,793 cópias, 15 resenhas
The Cloud of Unknowing (1957) — Editor, algumas edições1,626 cópias, 11 resenhas
History of Rome, books 21-30 (0001) — Introdução, algumas edições1,338 cópias, 7 resenhas
The Rise And Fall Of Athens: Nine Greek Lives (0002) — Editor, algumas edições1,288 cópias, 2 resenhas
The Bacchae and Other Plays (0413) — Editor, algumas edições1,263 cópias, 10 resenhas
The Letters (0001) — Tradutor, algumas edições1,195 cópias, 18 resenhas
Egil's Saga (1240) — Editor, algumas edições1,093 cópias, 10 resenhas
The Vinland Sagas: The Norse Discovery of America (1965) — Editor — 1,019 cópias, 18 resenhas
Lady with Lapdog and Other Stories (1964) — Editor, algumas edições969 cópias, 13 resenhas
The Comedies (0166) — Tradutor, algumas edições898 cópias, 4 resenhas
The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works (1978) — Editor — 895 cópias, 4 resenhas
The Eclogues (0037) — Contribuinte, algumas edições845 cópias, 7 resenhas
3 Plays: Alcestis / Hippolytus / Iphigenia in Taurus (0438) — Editor, algumas edições648 cópias, 3 resenhas
History of Rome, books 6-10 (0001) — Tradutor, algumas edições561 cópias
The Journey Through Wales and The Description of Wales (1191) — Editor, algumas edições553 cópias, 5 resenhas
Classical Literary Criticism (0384) — Editor, algumas edições464 cópias, 1 resenha
Memoirs of My Life (1796) — Editor, algumas edições401 cópias, 10 resenhas
The Story of His Misfortunes and The Love Letters of Abelard and Heloise (1132) — Tradutor, algumas edições120 cópias, 1 resenha
The Letters, books 1-7 (1969) — Tradutor, algumas edições98 cópias
Pliny: A Self Portrait in Letters (1978) — Tradutor, algumas edições95 cópias, 1 resenha
The Letters, books 8-10; Panegyricus (1969) — Tradutor, algumas edições93 cópias
The history of the decline and fall of the Roman empire. Vol. 4: The end of the Western Empire (1986) — Editor, algumas edições; Editor, algumas edições76 cópias
Phormio & Other Plays (1958) — Tradutor, algumas edições32 cópias, 1 resenha
The Brothers and Other Plays (1965) — Tradutor, algumas edições29 cópias
Oxford Readings in Latin Panegyric (2012) — Contribuinte — 5 cópias

Etiquetado

(1,070) ancient (867) Ancient Greece (791) ancient history (1,245) Ancient Rome (738) antiquity (547) Church History (504) classic (1,105) classical (575) classical literature (734) classics (4,326) drama (1,524) epic (762) epic poetry (463) fiction (1,634) Folio Society (651) Greece (963) Greek (1,230) Greek literature (525) Hinduism (429) history (5,223) Latin (1,189) Latin literature (631) literature (2,155) medieval (450) non-fiction (1,999) Penguin Classics (746) philosophy (3,025) plays (594) poetry (2,988) read (472) religion (1,156) Roman (770) Roman History (502) Roman literature (437) Rome (1,298) to-read (2,236) translation (948) unread (410) Virgil (475)

Conhecimento Comum

Membros

Resenhas

This book was probably extremely useful in 1971, but has since lost some of its use. Wikipedia provides the same information and often more on these characters from Ancient History than this book does and may even have more updated information. Nevertheless this book is far more trustworthy than Wikipedia and in that sense could be very useful.
 
Marcado
Marnix.Princen | outras 2 resenhas | Jul 20, 2019 |

The early Greek philosophers, thinkers like Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides, Zeno, Empedocles, Leucippus, are foundational for the Western intellectual tradition. I couldn’t imagine a better introductory book then this one on the subject. Below are a few quotes from Jonathan Barnes’s excellent 40 page introduction along with my brief comments:

“First and most simply, the Presocratics invented the very idea of science and philosophy. They hit upon that special way of looking at the world which is the scientific and rational way. They saw the world as something ordered and intelligible, its history following an explicable course and its different parts arranged in a comprehensible system. The world was not a random collection of bits, its history was not an arbitrary jumble of events.” ---------- This is central to their spirit of inquiry, an approach compatible with a modern physicist or chemist.

“Nor was the world a series of events determined by the will or the caprice of the gods. The Presocratics were not atheists: they allowed the god into their brave new world, and some of them attempted to produce an improved and rationalized theology in place of the anthropomorphic divinities of the Olympian pantheon. But their theology had little to do with religion, and they removed most of the traditional functions of the gods. Their thunder was no longer the growling of a minatory Zeus.” ----------- Again, the Presocratics have kindred spirits in the science departments at modern universities.

Jonathan Barnes goes on to write how the Presocratics explained the world in ways that were systematic and economical, that is, these early philosophers wanted to “explain as much as possible in terms of as little as possible.” Some of their key concepts were order (kosmos), nature (phusis), origins (arche) , and reason (logos). --------- These Greek words are supercharged with meaning. I use one English word for simplicity sake. How supercharged? The author does a fine job elaborating.

The actual words of the Presocratics have come down to us as fragments. Here are several of my favorites:

Xenophanes
“But if cows and horses or lions had hands and drew with their hands or made the things men make, then horses would draw the forms of gods like horses, cows like cows, and each would make their bodies similar in shape to their own.”

Heraclitus
“The uncomprehending, when they hear, are like the deaf. To them applies the saying: though present they are absent.”

Democritus
“To a wise man the whole earth is accessible; for the country of a great soul is the whole world.”

“The desire for more destroys what is present – like Aesop’s dog.”

“One should tell the truth, not speak at length.”
… (mais)
 
Marcado
Glenn_Russell | outras 4 resenhas | Nov 13, 2018 |
In many ways we can simply make the statement that the Greeks invented philosophy. For roughly eleven centuries Greek philosophy held first place in the world. Pre-Socratics as the title of these philosophers is a bit of a misnomer since they actually over lapoed the life of Socrates. Nonetheless, these are important contributions and well worth reading.
 
Marcado
gmicksmith | outras 4 resenhas | Jul 15, 2018 |

The early Greek philosophers, thinkers like Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides, Zeno, Empedocles, Leucippus, are foundational for the Western intellectual tradition. I couldn’t imagine a better introductory book then this one on the subject. Below are a few quotes from Jonathan Barnes’s excellent 40 page introduction along with my brief comments:

“First and most simply, the Presocratics invented the very idea of science and philosophy. They hit upon that special way of looking at the world which is the scientific and rational way. They saw the world as something ordered and intelligible, its history following an explicable course and its different parts arranged in a comprehensible system. The world was not a random collection of bits, its history was not an arbitrary jumble of events.” ---------- This is central to their spirit of inquiry, an approach compatible with a modern physicist or chemist.

“Nor was the world a series of events determined by the will or the caprice of the gods. The Presocratics were not atheists: they allowed the god into their brave new world, and some of them attempted to produce an improved and rationalized theology in place of the anthropomorphic divinities of the Olympian pantheon. But their theology had little to do with religion, and they removed most of the traditional functions of the gods. Their thunder was no longer the growling of a minatory Zeus.” ----------- Again, the Presocratics have kindred spirits in the science departments at modern universities.

Jonathan Barnes goes on to write how the Presocratics explained the world in ways that were systematic and economical, that is, these early philosophers wanted to “explain as much as possible in terms of as little as possible.” Some of their key concepts were order (kosmos), nature (phusis), origins (arche) , and reason (logos). --------- These Greek words are supercharged with meaning. I use one English word for simplicity sake. How supercharged? The author does a fine job elaborating.

The actual words of the Presocratics have come down to us as fragments. Here are several of my favorites:

Xenophanes
“But if cows and horses or lions had hands and drew with their hands or made the things men make, then horses would draw the forms of gods like horses, cows like cows, and each would make their bodies similar in shape to their own.”

Heraclitus
“The uncomprehending, when they hear, are like the deaf. To them applies the saying: though present they are absent.”

Democritus
“To a wise man the whole earth is accessible; for the country of a great soul is the whole world.”

“The desire for more destroys what is present – like Aesop’s dog.”

“One should tell the truth, not speak at length.”
… (mais)
 
Marcado
GlennRussell | outras 4 resenhas | Feb 16, 2017 |

Listas

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Estatísticas

Obras
11
Also by
40
Membros
1,084
Popularidade
#23,706
Avaliação
3.9
Resenhas
8
ISBNs
6
Idiomas
1
Favorito
1

Tabelas & Gráficos