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Taran Matharu

Autor(a) de The Novice

42 Works 3,339 Membros 72 Reviews

About the Author

Taran Matharu began posting The Novice on Wattpad (the online writing website) and reached over three million reads in less than six months. The Novice is the first of three books in the Summoner series, and Taran Matharu's fiction debut. Taran's second book in The Summoner Trilogy, The mostrar mais Inquisition, made the New York Times Best Seller list in 2016. (Bowker Author Biography) mostrar menos

Includes the name: Taran Matharu (author)

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Séries

Obras de Taran Matharu

The Novice (2015) 1,324 cópias
The Inquisition (2016) 646 cópias
The Battlemage (2017) 501 cópias
The Outcast (2018) 306 cópias
The Chosen (2019) 224 cópias
The Summoner's Handbook (2018) 85 cópias
The Challenger (2020) 47 cópias
Origins (Summoner, #0.5) (2015) 44 cópias
The Champion (2021) 36 cópias
Challenger (Contender, 2) (2020) 19 cópias
Dragon Rider: A Novel (2024) 17 cópias
Summoner 2 - De edele (2017) 10 cópias
Contender (2 Book Series) (2020) 6 cópias

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Data de nascimento
1990
Sexo
male
Nacionalidade
UK
Locais de residência
London, England, UK

Membros

Resenhas

Discover a rich world of magic, warriors, and dragons, in which a fearless orphan and an ambitious handmaiden flee from the empire that would imprison them, with a dream to return to their homelands and a determination that’s unbreakable… Can an orphan captive learn the secrets of the Dragon Riders to stand up and avenge his people? Jai lives as a royal hostage in the Sabine Court—ever since his father Rohan, leader of the Steppefolk, led a failed rebellion and was executed by the very emperor Jai now serves. When the emperor’s son and heir is betrothed to Princess Erica of the neighboring Dansk Kingdom, she brings with her a dragons. Endemic to the northern nation, these powerful beasts come in several forms, but mystery surrounds them. Only Dansk royalty know the secret to soulbonding with these dangerous beasts to draw on their power and strength. This marriage—and the alliance that forms—will change that forever. But conspirators lurk in the shadows, and soon the Sabine Court is in chaos. With his life in danger, Jai uses the opportunity to escape with the Dansk handmaiden, Frida, and a stolen hatchling. Hunted at every turn, he must learn to cultivate magic and become a soulbound warrior if he has any chance of finding safety, seizing his destiny…and seeking his revenge.… (mais)
 
Marcado
rachelprice14 | Nov 16, 2023 |
A young blacksmith apprentice stumbles onto a magical book that he can't resist reading from, which summons a small demon from another world. This is an ability only certain people have, which makes Fletcher special (he can also cast spells, and just to be clear, the demon is basically an otherworldly animal). Shortly thereafter, he is forced to flee his hometown and basically stumbles upon a school for summoners. There, summoners are trained to become battlemages, so they can fight in a never-ending war against orcs.

By halfway through the book, I described it as Harry Potter* meets Pokemon, though I'll say that the demon pet aspect didn't end up being as pronounced as I expected it to be (I still wanted one of my own though). Throw in some elf/dwarf/orc stereotypes straight out of something like Lord of the Rings or even World of Warcraft, and you have this book. I personally enjoyed the way these elements came together.

Race and class warfare are a large part of what drives this book. This book of the trilogy focuses on the Fletcher learning about his newfound magic and training to compete in a tournament, the winner of which gains a coveted high officer spot in the nation's military. But being part of a larger series, it's clear that it's being set up for bigger, more important things to come.

A few downsides I want to mention--some parts of the book are a bit predictable, but plenty of it was unexpected. The biggest issue I had was with some of the writing, especially the dialog tags. Even this is a small issue overall, but characters so often "growl" their dialog, and it started to become distracting to me. There was at least one other commonly used dialog action that was strange to me, though I don't recall what it is now. Also, characters are often whispering into each others ears, even as they're walking, and I'm imagining them hanging on each other while they're talking. Again, a minor thing, but it did bring me out of the story at times.

I was very unhappy with the ending--not because it didn't make sense or didn't have every reason to happen. It does set up the 2nd book. But I didn't like where it leaves the second book to start, so after enjoying the rest, I was disappointed by the ending. However, this is not a statement of bad writing or storytelling, just something I found myself disliking. I'm still looking forward to reading the next book (which I'll come back to after reading a few other books).
… (mais)
 
Marcado
Kristi_D | outras 38 resenhas | Sep 22, 2023 |
The Inquisition picks up immediately after the previous story's end, with the main character, Fletcher, and what's left of his unit jumping into the otherworldy ether to escape the enemy. They must find a way to return home, and then deal with the aftermath of their mission in the jungle, which ended in treachery and betrayal. Meanwhile, the orcs are poised to invade Fletcher's country with an army that might be too large to overcome.

This book did a great job of wrapping up the entire trilogy, while being a fully story on its own. I was a lot more excited going into this one than into the 2nd one, based on the cliffhanger at the end of the previous books, and the ether didn't disappoint. The book was more distinctly 3 separate acts than any book I've really ever read, and the second act was also a lot of fun to read. By the third act, I knew what was coming, and it did end up being my least favorite part of the book. But that is purely personal preference, as I'll explain further below.

It was great to see back some of the characters from the first book, and a little from the second. I was a little disappointed that we didn't get to see much more of Arcturus, and overall, he wasn't in the trilogy as much as I would have hoped and expected, especially considering that the prequel is about his history.

I enjoyed the middle act, where we really get to see Fletcher grow as a leader, and where the race warfare throughout the trilogy comes to a head, a lot more than I would have thought I would. But I knew what was looming--the big war with the orcs. I don't personally care for large-scale, devastating wars in books, so that's why the third act my least favorite. It was made better by getting to see Fletcher's ingenuity though, plus I like the addition of the demons during the fighting.

The ending of the book had some moments I was really happy to see, but also failed to wrap up some storylines in a way I would have preferred. However, I wasn't left with the feeling that anything was completely neglected, so I can't really complain. For some reason, I was just left with this feeling of it being anti-climactic, but I can't explain why. I think it's just because I would have liked more in the series in general. Overall, this entire trilogy was a solid 4 stars for me.

After reading the first book, I described it as a mix between Harry Potter and Pokemon, even though at the time, I hadn't read any Harry Potter. I have read the first 2 in the series now, and I stand by my assessment, but only of the first book. The second and third books could better be compared to Warcraft, or even LoTR somewhat. In general, though, I would recommend this trilogy to anyone who enjoys magical fantasy books.
… (mais)
 
Marcado
Kristi_D | outras 5 resenhas | Sep 22, 2023 |
(3.5 / 5)

In a land where only children of noble birth have the ability to summon demons, Arcturus, an orphan and stable boy, accidentally becomes the first common summoner. He is drawn into a political battle that threatens his life and the lives of those noble-born students he is studying alongside. He'll have to choose between his fellow commoners or his fellow summoners.

On its own, this book was intriguing and exciting with good world-building and some engaging characters. However, as a prequel, it had some issues--namely too much repetition from the original trilogy and too many characters in common.

The first third or so was especially had a lot of similarities to the first book in the series. A commoner unintentionally summons a demon, is whisked away to Vocans, the summoner school, and is snubbed by some, but not all, of the nobles while being far friendlier with the servants and "lower" races than most other humans. Even some of the early explanations of how spells work felt repetitious.

Prince Harold in particular I really liked in this book. And Captain Lovett as a teenager was quite the fun and rambunctious character too. However, while it was kinda neat to see characters in this book that were in the trilogy, or were parents of characters in the trilogy, when all of these characters who we know are alive years later are put into peril, there's no question of whether they will survive or not. Though I will say that, for me, this didn't mean there was no suspense. There was still some danger, but it wasn't as exciting as it could have been.

As for Arcturus himself, who is very similar in personality to Fletcher from the trilogy, when I was reading through the trilogy, I really liked Arcturus. And when I saw there was a prequel about him, I expected there to be a lot more of him in the last half of the trilogy than there ended up being. In the end, perhaps he wasn't the best choice for the subject of a full-length prequel novel. Yes, he was the first common summoner, which was mentioned in the trilogy but made for a decent story on its own. But from what I understand, Matharu had already written a shorter story of his origin, and then later turned that into the full novel. But the story wasn't far enough removed, and the time it took place wasn't long enough before the trilogy, for this to work all that well as a prequel.

I wonder if it might actually work better if this book were to be read before the trilogy. I can't guarantee that there wouldn't be some world-building that was lacking in the prequel, because the reader is expected to know the world already, but I didn't really think that was the case. Whether or not someone who has read the trilogy absolutely needs to read the prequel before calling this series complete, I would say...it's a toss-up.
… (mais)
 
Marcado
Kristi_D | outras 5 resenhas | Sep 22, 2023 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
42
Membros
3,339
Popularidade
#7,651
Avaliação
½ 3.7
Resenhas
72
ISBNs
143
Idiomas
11

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