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Azar Gat

Autor(a) de War in Human Civilization

13+ Works 380 Membros 5 Reviews

About the Author

Azar Gat is Associate Professor in, and Chairman of, the Department of Political Science, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Obras de Azar Gat

Associated Works

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Nome padrão
Gat, Azar
Data de nascimento
1959
Sexo
male
Nacionalidade
Israel
Local de nascimento
Haifa, Israel
Educação
University of Haifa (BA)
University of Tel Aviv (MA)
Oxford University (PhD)
Ocupação
military historian
Organizações
Israeli Army (Major)

Membros

Resenhas

A fresh take on ethnicity, nationalism, and international comparative politics that shakes Benedict Anderson to his core.
 
Marcado
bdtrump | May 9, 2015 |
War in Human Civilization by Azar Gat is really two books in one. Part One is the first book. It essentially answers the question: why do humans fight. Parts Two and Three comprise the second book. They seek to answer the question of how have human civilization and culture interacted with war since the advent of farming and pastoralism.

The answer to the first question is evolution. Gat explains the existence of human violence as an evolutionary response to the scarcity that mankind experienced throughout most of its evolutionary history. While I strongly agree with Gat's thesis, I found his supporting information to be thin. While he effectively refutes the notion that human beings, and most other mammals for that reason, are inherently non-violent toward members of their own species, he does not amass nearly enough support for his contention that our violent natures are the result of inbred evolutionary pressures.

The answer to the second question is far more complicated. In essence Gat states that the "progress" that humans have made since the earliest days of farming has resulted in the creation of ever-more lethal armies, which has, in turn, resulted in ever greater concentrations of political power as societies sought protection in numbers from their enemies. On the other hand, the lethality of such military forces has caused an ever decreasing occurrence of war to the point where it now has not occurred between two Great Powers since the end of World War II.

As thin as the evidence supporting his first thesis was, the evidence supporting the second one is even thinner, to the point of being almost non-existent once Gat reaches the 20th century. At least Gat acknowledges the lack of support in this part and explains it away as something akin to common knowledge.

Despite his failure to provide enough support for his theses, Gat's War in Human Civilization is basically a must-read for anyone interested in the age-old question of why human beings engage in activity as destructive and barbaric as war.
… (mais)
½
2 vote
Marcado
Bretzky1 | outras 2 resenhas | Aug 1, 2011 |
I have been working my way through this for the last several weeks. Short version: it is fabulous. Maybe the best non-fiction book I've ever read.
1 vote
Marcado
ben_a | outras 2 resenhas | May 22, 2008 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
13
Also by
1
Membros
380
Popularidade
#63,551
Avaliação
4.1
Resenhas
5
ISBNs
39
Idiomas
2

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