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Elinor Fettiplace

Autor(a) de Elinor Fettiplace's Receipt Book

4 Works 136 Membros 4 Reviews

About the Author

Disambiguation Notice:

(eng) Note: "The Complete Receipt Books of Ladie Elynor Fettiplace" is a 68 page pamphlet transcribed from the original, and is *not* the same as the much longer book edited by Hilary Spurling.

Obras de Elinor Fettiplace

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Data de nascimento
16th Century
Sexo
female
Nacionalidade
UK
Aviso de desambiguação
Note: "The Complete Receipt Books of Ladie Elynor Fettiplace" is a 68 page pamphlet transcribed from the original, and is *not* the same as the much longer book edited by Hilary Spurling.

Membros

Resenhas

 
Marcado
ShelleyAlberta | outras 3 resenhas | Jun 4, 2016 |
The handwritten receipt book upon which this book is based was handed down in the family until it reached the author. How frequently does THAT happen? The result is the kind of cookbook I like: it gives the original recipes and a "working version", so one can easily compare the two and see how faithful the modern version is to the original. These recipes are interspersed with much interesting prose. The addition of a blank line between discussion of one recipe and the next would have vastly improved readableness. It also would have been more useful if the helpful comments re measures and approximations of Jacobean ingredients had been made more prominent and not buried in the text.… (mais)
 
Marcado
ErstwhileEditor | outras 3 resenhas | May 11, 2011 |
Some recipes transcribed from a personal cookery manuscript, originally written down in 1604. Some commentary by the editor. Recipes are arranged seasonally. The biggest flaw is that some recipes were added at a later date and they are not always identified by the editor. A careful reading shows that "Chocolate Cream" was added in the 18th century and is not documentation for early use of chocolate in England.
 
Marcado
casamoomba | outras 3 resenhas | Nov 1, 2005 |
“…Hilary Spurling inherited from an old aunt a little leather-bound manuscript volume, which in fact contained all the recipes of someone called Elinor Fettiplace, who wrote it out in 1604. And so Spurling turned it into a book with about 200 of the recipes, with her comments and the background and history of Elinor Fettiplace and her family. Fettiplace was the daughter of a man who lived at Sapperton in Gloucestershire, so she came from a good country house background. She married into the Fettiplace family who were Oxfordshire gentry. This book enables you to see the Elizabethans through their food in a very intriguing way, and she actually tried out a lot of the recipes herself. They’re not just recipes for eating – there are recipes for medicine, and recipes for scent: Elizabethans loved to put very intense smells into pots which you could open up and the smell would come out.….” (Reviewed by Mark Girouard in FiveBooks).



The full interview is available here: http://fivebooks.com/interviews/mark-girouard-on-art-and-culture-elizabethan-eng...
… (mais)
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
1 vote |
Marcado
FiveBooks | outras 3 resenhas | May 18, 2010 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
4
Membros
136
Popularidade
#149,926
Avaliação
½ 4.4
Resenhas
4
ISBNs
7

Tabelas & Gráficos