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34+ Works 1,329 Membros 19 Reviews

About the Author

Stephanie Alexander ran the acclaimed Stephanie's Restaurant, which was the recipient of many national and international awards and regarded as an essential Melbourne experience, for twenty-one years. She closed the restaurant to concentrate on new ventures and writing. With her daughter Lisa mostrar mais Montague, friend Angela Clemens and cheese expert Will Studd, she opened the popular Richmond Hill Cafe and Larder in 1997 mostrar menos

Séries

Obras de Stephanie Alexander

The Cook's Companion (1996) 228 cópias
Tuscan Cookbook (1998) 162 cópias
A Shared Table (1999) 55 cópias
Stephanie's Journal (1999) 45 cópias
Recipes My Mother Gave Me (1997) — Editor — 34 cópias
Stephanie's Seasons (1993) 26 cópias
Stephanie's Australia (1991) 23 cópias
A Cook's Life (2012) 23 cópias
Home (2021) 20 cópias

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Membros

Discussions

Stephanie Alexander em Cookbookers (Março 2012)

Resenhas

I bought this when it first came out and then I bought the second edition as well. Perhaps this will speak better than words as to the estimation with which I hold The Cook’s Companion.

Still. I like words, and I’m a bit shocked to discover that I’ve never written about this book. It is, in my opinion as the chief household cook, as a person who loves to read cookbooks, and as a bookseller of cookbooks over the years, one of those classics which will be with us in a hundred years’ time.

The aim of the author was to appeal to ordinary folk and so it is full of things that anybody can do. Its Australian bent discusses food from that local perspective, ingredients by class, what one should and shouldn’t, can and can’t do with them. Its generous layout permits margin notes, small ideas which are as important to the book as the more lavish recipes which take most of the page. Grate apple, says one such note. Breakfast is strong toast, generously buttered, with the apple on top. Cinnamon, of course. I discovered this in a period where I didn’t eat sugar and it was a revelation as a simple, healthy dessert breakfast. Alternatively, I discovered, mash banana and have it the same way instead. This book is not about slavishly follow it, you will also think for yourself. One thing will come from another.

rest here: https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2018/07/16/the-cooks-companion-by-st...
… (mais)
 
Marcado
bringbackbooks | outras 7 resenhas | Jun 16, 2020 |
I bought this when it first came out and then I bought the second edition as well. Perhaps this will speak better than words as to the estimation with which I hold The Cook’s Companion.

Still. I like words, and I’m a bit shocked to discover that I’ve never written about this book. It is, in my opinion as the chief household cook, as a person who loves to read cookbooks, and as a bookseller of cookbooks over the years, one of those classics which will be with us in a hundred years’ time.

The aim of the author was to appeal to ordinary folk and so it is full of things that anybody can do. Its Australian bent discusses food from that local perspective, ingredients by class, what one should and shouldn’t, can and can’t do with them. Its generous layout permits margin notes, small ideas which are as important to the book as the more lavish recipes which take most of the page. Grate apple, says one such note. Breakfast is strong toast, generously buttered, with the apple on top. Cinnamon, of course. I discovered this in a period where I didn’t eat sugar and it was a revelation as a simple, healthy dessert breakfast. Alternatively, I discovered, mash banana and have it the same way instead. This book is not about slavishly follow it, you will also think for yourself. One thing will come from another.

rest here: https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2018/07/16/the-cooks-companion-by-st...
… (mais)
 
Marcado
bringbackbooks | outras 7 resenhas | Jun 16, 2020 |
I bought this when it first came out and then I bought the second edition as well. Perhaps this will speak better than words as to the estimation with which I hold The Cook’s Companion.

Still. I like words, and I’m a bit shocked to discover that I’ve never written about this book. It is, in my opinion as the chief household cook, as a person who loves to read cookbooks, and as a bookseller of cookbooks over the years, one of those classics which will be with us in a hundred years’ time.

The aim of the author was to appeal to ordinary folk and so it is full of things that anybody can do. Its Australian bent discusses food from that local perspective, ingredients by class, what one should and shouldn’t, can and can’t do with them. Its generous layout permits margin notes, small ideas which are as important to the book as the more lavish recipes which take most of the page. Grate apple, says one such note. Breakfast is strong toast, generously buttered, with the apple on top. Cinnamon, of course. I discovered this in a period where I didn’t eat sugar and it was a revelation as a simple, healthy dessert breakfast. Alternatively, I discovered, mash banana and have it the same way instead. This book is not about slavishly follow it, you will also think for yourself. One thing will come from another.

rest here: https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2018/07/16/the-cooks-companion-by-st...
… (mais)
 
Marcado
bringbackbooks | outras 7 resenhas | Jun 16, 2020 |
Getting a glimpse inside the lives of well known public figures is always fascinating. Which is one reason I found Stephanie Alexander’s memoir “A Cook’s Life” absorbing reading. Another is that as an iconic and pioneering figure in Australia’s gastronomic scene over the past several decades, Stephanie Alexander has a lot of expert knowledge about the world of food, fine dining, restaurants and food related travel. For anyone interested in Australia’s remarkable culinary evolution over the last thirty years or so, this book is a valuable reference. It’s not what I’d describe as having literary flair and she does get bogged down in what seems unnecessary and irrelevant detail at times. A more judicious edit could have cut the length considerably and made it a better read. Still it was reassuring to read that someone who considers herself painfully shy and unattractive because of her pale and freckled skin has made of her life such a remarkable achievement.… (mais)
 
Marcado
Anne_Green | Mar 17, 2014 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
34
Also by
1
Membros
1,329
Popularidade
#19,360
Avaliação
4.2
Resenhas
19
ISBNs
94
Idiomas
8

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