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Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World (2015)

de Stanley A. McChrystal, Tantum Collins, Chris Fussell, David Silverman

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As commander of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), General Stanley McChrystal played a crucial role in the War on Terror. But when he took the helm in 2004, America was losing that war badly: despite vastly inferior resources and technology, Al Qaeda was outmaneuvering America's most elite warriors. McChrystal came to realize that today's faster, more interdependent world had overwhelmed the conventional, top-down hierarchy of the U.S. military. Al Qaeda had seen the future: a decentralized network that could move quickly and strike ruthlessly. To defeat such an enemy, JSOC would have to discard a century of management wisdom, and pivot from a pursuit of mechanical efficiency to organic adaptability. Under McChrystal's leadership, JSOC remade itself, in the midst of a grueling war, into something entirely new: a network that combined robust centralized communication with decentralized managerial authority. As a result, they beat back Al Qaeda. In this book, McChrystal shows not only how the military made that transition, but also how similar shifts are possible in all organizations, from large companies to startups to charities to governments. In a turbulent world, the best organizations think and act like a team of teams, embracing small groups that combine the freedom to experiment with a relentless drive to share what they've learned. Drawing on a wealth of evidence from his military career, the private sector, and sources as diverse as hospital emergency rooms and NASA's space program, McChrystal frames the existential challenge facing today's organizations, and proposes a compelling, effective solution.… (mais)
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Exibindo 5 de 5
Not even the military thinks classic command and control is an good way to work. ( )
  paven | Jan 26, 2021 |
In looking for ideas on how to improve relative to my work I read much on various management/leadership and technology topics. This was one of those searches for new ideas on which to build improvement. It came recommended to me by someone from work and seemed to begin with much promise, but I found I kept waiting for the ideas and new concepts to come. The first three-fourths of this book seems to focus on building the argument for the last fourth, and when I got to the solutions, I found them relatively stale and uninspiring. Some of the stories and examples in the book were entertaining, but I never uncovered anything of significant value. ( )
  afkendrick | Oct 24, 2020 |
I picked up Stanley McChrystal's book, Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World because I really enjoyed the message he shared when writing My Share of the Task: A Memoir. I was curious how he pulled it together and what lessons he had to share. More importantly, I was looking for ideas I could use for my small team and institution. I was not disappointed. This book helped to flesh out some points he made in his first book. Team of Teams focused on his operations in Iraq and the interworkings of countless agencies. I would be curious how the lessons could be applied for a business. Personally, I enjoyed the book; however, I think some would be put off on the heavy focus on military operations. Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
Team of Teams by Gen. Stanley McChrystal talks about organisational dynamics and leadership in the US army. Stanley McChrystal is a US General who lead Special Task Forces and had to modify his army’s organisation to better fight Al-Qaeda militants in Iraq. The book is a personal memoir of transforming Joint Special Operations Command. It describes how to adapt old hierarchical structures to fit the current complex world and create an agile organisation that can rapidly react to outside quick challenges. The book presents steps as well as strategies regarding resilience and adaptability with regards to confronting difficult situations. The aim of the book is to show that the strategy used in Iraq could effectively be applied to businesses as well as different institutions.

Anyway, McChrystal starts with Iraq where he found that the standard model of commanding the US army didn’t work. This was not a war of planning and discipline, but more agility and innovation situation. in the old model of business, planning was one of the most important keys to overall success but in the past, the world and industries weren’t changing as quickly as now. Of course, the planning process is still crucial, but now it’s about agility and innovation. The book says that today’s world is less about how to optimise for the known, the relatively stable set of variables. We should be rather looking for to innovate and change with the times.

Next, the book talks a lot about empowerment, care and relentless nurturing of competence and ability of your team. What innovation requires is a great team of people underneath you, the team that can come up with ideas. The author compares this process to gardening which needs your time and patience. When it comes to caring, McChrystal writes a lot about competition and even antagonisms between different units in the US army. Military culture has a sense of tribalism where different components see themselves as being better than others. Then he presents his approach to consolidate his teams and develop a way to establish links between them as teams whose members know one another perform better. Such teams can self monitor each other which save a lot of time regarding day to day supervision, of course, if needed. This also implies continuous communication at all times.

In addition to empowerment, McChrystal presents transparency as something extremely important in the lower military ranks. They watch the actions of their leaders and not only listen to what they have to say. Each member of the US army needs to feel they have a stake in the outcome, therefore, they need motivation and reward. As a manager, you have to remember that your team is made up of people who each have a certain role to achieve a specific goal. The funny thing here is that the author supports this thesis by saying that: “If you ask people what their vision is, it’s not: ‘Hey, I’m here cutting this stone.’ It’s: ‘I’m part of a team-building a cathedral.” I’ve used the same anecdote in my public speech 2 weeks...(if you like to read my full review please visit my blog https://leadersarereaders.blog/team-of-teams/) ( )
  LeadersAreReaders | Dec 4, 2019 |
Having read several books recently on teamwork and collaboration, what I've not found is one that demonstrates how a leader realized what limiting factors needed to be addressed in their particular situation. Team of Teams does just that. Based on McChrystal's successful tour commanding the hunt for insurgents in Iraq, this book uses that journey as a story arc for explaining how to achieve the teamwork needed in our complex, fast-changing modern world. The military cases are as illuminating as they are gripping, and the author shares just as many examples from business and medicine so as not to make this a self-congratulatory biopic. To overcome the natural inertia of siloed intelligence gathering and decision making in an interdependent, fast-changing world, the answer is to develop great teamwork within teams and across teams. These teams of teams won't naturally bond the same way a smaller team of ten or up to thirty people might. By seeding at least some individual rapport across teams and encouraging open access to common information, leaders can cultivate shared purpose and trust, which gets reinforced the more the whole network sees examples of success toward their common end. ( )
  jpsnow | Jan 3, 2019 |
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Nome do autorFunçãoTipo de autorObra?Status
Stanley A. McChrystalautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Collins, Tantumautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Fussell, Chrisautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Silverman, Davidautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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As commander of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), General Stanley McChrystal played a crucial role in the War on Terror. But when he took the helm in 2004, America was losing that war badly: despite vastly inferior resources and technology, Al Qaeda was outmaneuvering America's most elite warriors. McChrystal came to realize that today's faster, more interdependent world had overwhelmed the conventional, top-down hierarchy of the U.S. military. Al Qaeda had seen the future: a decentralized network that could move quickly and strike ruthlessly. To defeat such an enemy, JSOC would have to discard a century of management wisdom, and pivot from a pursuit of mechanical efficiency to organic adaptability. Under McChrystal's leadership, JSOC remade itself, in the midst of a grueling war, into something entirely new: a network that combined robust centralized communication with decentralized managerial authority. As a result, they beat back Al Qaeda. In this book, McChrystal shows not only how the military made that transition, but also how similar shifts are possible in all organizations, from large companies to startups to charities to governments. In a turbulent world, the best organizations think and act like a team of teams, embracing small groups that combine the freedom to experiment with a relentless drive to share what they've learned. Drawing on a wealth of evidence from his military career, the private sector, and sources as diverse as hospital emergency rooms and NASA's space program, McChrystal frames the existential challenge facing today's organizations, and proposes a compelling, effective solution.

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